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Title: Detection in subsurface air of radioxenon released from medical isotope production

Abstract

Abstract Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, an On-Site Inspection (OSI) may be conducted to clarify whether a nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of Article I of the Treaty. A major component of an OSI is the measurement of subsurface gases in order to detect radioactive noble gases that are produced in a nuclear explosion, particularly radioxenon and radioargon. In order to better understand potential backgrounds of these gases, a sampling campaign was performed near Canadian Nuclear Laboratories in the Ottawa River Valley, a major source of environmental radioxenon. First of their kind measurements of atmospheric radioxenon imprinted into the shallow subsurface from an atmospheric pressure driven force were made using current OSI techniques to measure both atmospheric and subsurface gas samples which were analyzed for radioxenon. These measurements indicate that under specific sampling conditions, on the order of one percent of the atmospheric radioxenon concentration may be measured via subsurface sampling.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1344035
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-117917
Journal ID: ISSN 0265-931X; 453060036
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Environmental Radioactivity; Journal Volume: 167; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
07 ISOTOPE AND RADIATION SOURCES

Citation Formats

Johnson, Christine, Biegalski, Steven, Haas, Derek, Lowrey, Justin, Bowyer, Theodore, Hayes, James, Suarez, Reynold, and Ripplinger, Michael. Detection in subsurface air of radioxenon released from medical isotope production. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2016.10.021.
Johnson, Christine, Biegalski, Steven, Haas, Derek, Lowrey, Justin, Bowyer, Theodore, Hayes, James, Suarez, Reynold, & Ripplinger, Michael. Detection in subsurface air of radioxenon released from medical isotope production. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2016.10.021.
Johnson, Christine, Biegalski, Steven, Haas, Derek, Lowrey, Justin, Bowyer, Theodore, Hayes, James, Suarez, Reynold, and Ripplinger, Michael. Wed . "Detection in subsurface air of radioxenon released from medical isotope production". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2016.10.021.
@article{osti_1344035,
title = {Detection in subsurface air of radioxenon released from medical isotope production},
author = {Johnson, Christine and Biegalski, Steven and Haas, Derek and Lowrey, Justin and Bowyer, Theodore and Hayes, James and Suarez, Reynold and Ripplinger, Michael},
abstractNote = {Abstract Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, an On-Site Inspection (OSI) may be conducted to clarify whether a nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of Article I of the Treaty. A major component of an OSI is the measurement of subsurface gases in order to detect radioactive noble gases that are produced in a nuclear explosion, particularly radioxenon and radioargon. In order to better understand potential backgrounds of these gases, a sampling campaign was performed near Canadian Nuclear Laboratories in the Ottawa River Valley, a major source of environmental radioxenon. First of their kind measurements of atmospheric radioxenon imprinted into the shallow subsurface from an atmospheric pressure driven force were made using current OSI techniques to measure both atmospheric and subsurface gas samples which were analyzed for radioxenon. These measurements indicate that under specific sampling conditions, on the order of one percent of the atmospheric radioxenon concentration may be measured via subsurface sampling.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jenvrad.2016.10.021},
journal = {Journal of Environmental Radioactivity},
number = C,
volume = 167,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}