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Title: Applying shot boundary detection for automated crystal growth analysis during in situ transmission electron microscope experiments

Authors:
; ; ; ; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1344022
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Advanced Structural and Chemical Imaging
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-02-16 08:52:37; Journal ID: ISSN 2198-0926
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Moeglein, W. A., Griswold, R., Mehdi, B. L., Browning, N. D., and Teuton, J. Applying shot boundary detection for automated crystal growth analysis during in situ transmission electron microscope experiments. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1186/s40679-016-0034-x.
Moeglein, W. A., Griswold, R., Mehdi, B. L., Browning, N. D., & Teuton, J. Applying shot boundary detection for automated crystal growth analysis during in situ transmission electron microscope experiments. Germany. doi:10.1186/s40679-016-0034-x.
Moeglein, W. A., Griswold, R., Mehdi, B. L., Browning, N. D., and Teuton, J. Tue . "Applying shot boundary detection for automated crystal growth analysis during in situ transmission electron microscope experiments". Germany. doi:10.1186/s40679-016-0034-x.
@article{osti_1344022,
title = {Applying shot boundary detection for automated crystal growth analysis during in situ transmission electron microscope experiments},
author = {Moeglein, W. A. and Griswold, R. and Mehdi, B. L. and Browning, N. D. and Teuton, J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1186/s40679-016-0034-x},
journal = {Advanced Structural and Chemical Imaging},
number = 1,
volume = 3,
place = {Germany},
year = {Tue Jan 03 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 03 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1186/s40679-016-0034-x

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  • In-situ (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) is being developed for numerous applications in the study of nucleation and growth under electrochemical driving forces. For this type of experiment, one of the key parameters is to identify when nucleation initiates. Typically the process of identifying the moment that crystals begin to form is a manual process requiring the user to perform an observation and respond accordingly (adjust focus, magnification, translate the stage etc.). However, as the speed of the cameras being used to perform these observations increases, the ability of a user to “catch” the important initial stage of nucleation decreasesmore » (there is more information that is available in the first few milliseconds of the process). Here we show that video shot boundary detection (SBD) can automatically detect frames where a change in the image occurs. We show that this method can be applied to quickly and accurately identify points of change during crystal growth. This technique allows for automated segmentation of a digital stream for further analysis and the assignment of arbitrary time stamps for the initiation of processes that are independent of the user’s ability to observe and react.« less
  • In situ investigations of rapid solidification in polycrystalline Al thin films were conducted using nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Differences in crystal growth rates and asymmetries in melt pool development were observed as the heat extraction geometry was varied by controlling the proximity of the laser-pulse irradiation and the associated induced melt pools to the edge of the transmission electron microscopy support grid, which acts as a large heat sink. Experimental parameters have been established to maximize the reproducibility of the material response to the laser-pulse-related heating and to ensure that observations of the dynamical behavior of themore » metal are free from artifacts, leading to accurate interpretations and quantifiable measurements with improved precision. Interface migration rate measurements revealed solidification velocities that increased consistently from ∼1.3 m s{sup −1} to ∼2.5 m s{sup −1} during the rapid solidification process of the Al thin films. Under the influence of an additional large heat sink, increased crystal growth rates as high as 3.3 m s{sup −1} have been measured. The in situ experiments also provided evidence for development of a partially melted, two-phase region prior to the onset of rapid solidification facilitated crystal growth. Using the experimental observations and associated measurements as benchmarks, finite-element modeling based calculations of the melt pool evolution after pulsed laser irradiation have been performed to obtain estimates of the temperature evolution in the thin films.« less
  • In situ investigations of rapid solidification in polycrystalline Al thin films were conducted using nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Differences in crystal growth rates and asymmetries in melt pool development were observed as the heat extraction geometry was varied by controlling the proximity of the laser-pulse irradiation and the associated induced melt pools to the edge of the transmission electron microscopy support grid, which acts as a large heat sink. Experimental parameters have been established to maximize the reproducibility of the material response to the laser-pulse-related heating and to ensure that observations of the dynamical behavior of themore » metal are free from artifacts, leading to accurate interpretations and quantifiable measurements with improved precision. Interface migration rate measurements revealed solidification velocities that increased consistently from ~1.3 m s –1 to ~2.5 m s –1 during the rapid solidification process of the Al thin films. Under the influence of an additional large heat sink, increased crystal growth rates as high as 3.3 m s –1 have been measured. The in situ experiments also provided evidence for development of a partially melted, two-phase region prior to the onset of rapid solidification facilitated crystal growth. As a result, using the experimental observations and associated measurements as benchmarks, finite-element modeling based calculations of the melt pool evolution after pulsed laser irradiation have been performed to obtain estimates of the temperature evolution in the thin films.« less