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Title: A novel method for generating molecular mixtures at extreme conditions: The case of fluorine and oxygen

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (UNLV)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - BASIC ENERGY SCIENCESNSFDOE-NNSA
OSTI Identifier:
1343976
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SHOCK COMPRESSION OF CONDENSED MATTER - 2015: Proceedings of the Conference of the American Physical Society Topical Group on Shock Compression of Condensed Matter;14-19 June 2015;Tampa Bay, Florida, USA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Pravica, Michael, White, Melanie, and Wang, Yonggang. A novel method for generating molecular mixtures at extreme conditions: The case of fluorine and oxygen. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4971586.
Pravica, Michael, White, Melanie, & Wang, Yonggang. A novel method for generating molecular mixtures at extreme conditions: The case of fluorine and oxygen. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4971586.
Pravica, Michael, White, Melanie, and Wang, Yonggang. Thu . "A novel method for generating molecular mixtures at extreme conditions: The case of fluorine and oxygen". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4971586.
@article{osti_1343976,
title = {A novel method for generating molecular mixtures at extreme conditions: The case of fluorine and oxygen},
author = {Pravica, Michael and White, Melanie and Wang, Yonggang},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4971586},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Feb 09 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • We have successfully created a segregated mixture of hydrogen and oxygen at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell using hard x-ray photochemistry. A keyhole (two holes connected by an opening) sample chamber was created in a metallic gasket to support two segregated powders of ammonia borane and potassium perchlorate, respectively, in each hole at a pressure of ∼5.0 GPa. Both holes were separately irradiated with synchrotron hard x-rays to release molecular oxygen and molecular hydrogen, respectively. Upon irradiation of the first KClO{sub 4}-containing hole, solid reddish-orange O{sub 2} appeared in the region of irradiation and molecular oxygen was foundmore » to diffuse throughout the entire sample region. The second ammonia borane-containing hole was then irradiated and H{sub 2} was observed to form via Raman spectroscopy. Water also was observed in the ammonia borane-containing hole and possibly (in the form of ice VII) in the second hole. This unique experiment demonstrates the ability to easily create solid mixtures of simple molecular systems via x-ray irradiation and then react them via further irradiation which will aid the study of chemistry under extreme conditions.« less
  • We have created a segregated mixture of molecular fluorine and oxygen at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) via useful hard x-ray photochemistry. Here, a keyhole-like sample chamber was created in a stainless steel gasket to hold two segregated powders of potassium tetrafluoroborate (KBF 4) and potassium perchlorate (KClO 4) respectively in each hole at a pressure of ~3.0 GPa. Both holes were individually irradiated with synchrotron hard x-rays to release molecular fluorine and molecular oxygen, respectively. Upon irradiation of the hole containing KBF 4 molecular fluorine appeared (as evidenced via Raman spectroscopy) near the region of irradiation.more » The second hole containing KClO 4 was then irradiated and reddish-orange O 2 was observed to form. Oxygen was observed to diffuse throughout both holes whereas molecular fluorine did not. There is some evidence that oxygen difluoride (OF 2) was formed in the hole originally containing the KBF 4.« less
  • The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) is introduced as a novel tool for in situ processing of materials. Examples of various types of dynamic studies outline the advantages and differences of laser-based heating in the DTEM in comparison to conventional (resistive) heating in situ TEM methods. We demonstrate various unique capabilities of the drive laser, namely, in situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. These experiments would otherwise be impossible without the use of the DTEM drive laser. Thus, the potential of the DTEM to as a new technique tomore » process and characterize the growth of a myriad of micro and nanostructures is demonstrated.« less