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Title: Ternary PtRuPd/C catalyst for high-performance, low-temperature direct dimethyl ether fuel cells

Abstract

Here, dimethyl ether (DME) is a promising alternative fuel option for direct-feed low-temperature fuel cells. Until recently, DME had not received the same attention as alcohol fuels, such as methanol or ethanol, despite its notable advantages. These advantages include a high theoretical open-cell voltage (1.18 V at 25 °C) that is similar to that of methanol (1.21 V), much lower toxicity than methanol, and no need for the carbon–carbon bond scission that is needed in ethanol oxidation. DME is biodegradable, has a higher energy content than methanol (8.2 vs. 6.1 kWh kg –1), and, like methanol, can be synthesized from recycled carbon dioxide. Although the performance of direct DME fuel cells (DDMEFCs) has progressed over the past few years, DDMEFCs have not been viewed as fully viable. In this work, we report much improved performance from the ternary Pt 55Ru 35Pd 10/C anode catalyst, allowing DDMEFCs to compete directly with direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). We also report results involving binary Pt alloys as reference catalysts and an in situ infrared electrochemical study to better understand the mechanism of DME electro-oxidation on ternary PtRuPd/C catalysts.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Fuel Cell Technologies Program (EE-3F)
OSTI Identifier:
1343708
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-24333
Journal ID: ISSN 2196-0216
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ChemElectroChem
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 2196-0216
Publisher:
ChemPubSoc Europe
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; dimethyl ether; DME; direct-feed fuel cells; electrocatalysis; infrared spectroelectrochemical studies; oxidation

Citation Formats

Dumont, Joseph Henry, Martinez, Ulises, Chung, Hoon T., and Zelenay, Piotr. Ternary PtRuPd/C catalyst for high-performance, low-temperature direct dimethyl ether fuel cells. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/celc.201600336.
Dumont, Joseph Henry, Martinez, Ulises, Chung, Hoon T., & Zelenay, Piotr. Ternary PtRuPd/C catalyst for high-performance, low-temperature direct dimethyl ether fuel cells. United States. doi:10.1002/celc.201600336.
Dumont, Joseph Henry, Martinez, Ulises, Chung, Hoon T., and Zelenay, Piotr. 2016. "Ternary PtRuPd/C catalyst for high-performance, low-temperature direct dimethyl ether fuel cells". United States. doi:10.1002/celc.201600336. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1343708.
@article{osti_1343708,
title = {Ternary PtRuPd/C catalyst for high-performance, low-temperature direct dimethyl ether fuel cells},
author = {Dumont, Joseph Henry and Martinez, Ulises and Chung, Hoon T. and Zelenay, Piotr},
abstractNote = {Here, dimethyl ether (DME) is a promising alternative fuel option for direct-feed low-temperature fuel cells. Until recently, DME had not received the same attention as alcohol fuels, such as methanol or ethanol, despite its notable advantages. These advantages include a high theoretical open-cell voltage (1.18 V at 25 °C) that is similar to that of methanol (1.21 V), much lower toxicity than methanol, and no need for the carbon–carbon bond scission that is needed in ethanol oxidation. DME is biodegradable, has a higher energy content than methanol (8.2 vs. 6.1 kWh kg–1), and, like methanol, can be synthesized from recycled carbon dioxide. Although the performance of direct DME fuel cells (DDMEFCs) has progressed over the past few years, DDMEFCs have not been viewed as fully viable. In this work, we report much improved performance from the ternary Pt55Ru35Pd10/C anode catalyst, allowing DDMEFCs to compete directly with direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). We also report results involving binary Pt alloys as reference catalysts and an in situ infrared electrochemical study to better understand the mechanism of DME electro-oxidation on ternary PtRuPd/C catalysts.},
doi = {10.1002/celc.201600336},
journal = {ChemElectroChem},
number = 10,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

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