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Title: Extreme-value statistics reveal rare failure-critical defects in additive manufacturing

Abstract

Additive manufacturing enables the rapid, cost effective production of large populations of material test coupons such as tensile bars. By adopting streamlined test methods including ‘drop-in’ grips and non-contact extensometry, testing these large populations becomes more efficient. Unlike hardness tests, the tensile test provides a direct measure of yield strength, flow properties, and ductility, which can be directly incorporated into solid mechanics simulations. In the present work, over 1000 nominally identical tensile tests were used to explore the effect of process variability on the mechanical property distributions of a precipitation hardened stainless steel, 17-4PH, produced by a laser powder bed fusion process, also known as direct metal laser sintering. With this large dataset, rare defects are revealed that affect only ~2% of the population, stemming from a single build lot of material. Lastly, the rare defects caused a substantial loss in ductility and were associated with an interconnected network of porosity.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1343622
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-0719J
Journal ID: ISSN 1438-1656; 650654
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Engineering Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1438-1656
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; additive manufacturing; power bed fusion; deformation; tensile; statistics

Citation Formats

Boyce, Brad L., Salzbrenner, Bradley C., Rodelas, Jeffrey M., Swiler, Laura P., Madison, Jonathan D., Jared, Bradley H., and Shen, Yu -Lin. Extreme-value statistics reveal rare failure-critical defects in additive manufacturing. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/adem.201700102.
Boyce, Brad L., Salzbrenner, Bradley C., Rodelas, Jeffrey M., Swiler, Laura P., Madison, Jonathan D., Jared, Bradley H., & Shen, Yu -Lin. Extreme-value statistics reveal rare failure-critical defects in additive manufacturing. United States. doi:10.1002/adem.201700102.
Boyce, Brad L., Salzbrenner, Bradley C., Rodelas, Jeffrey M., Swiler, Laura P., Madison, Jonathan D., Jared, Bradley H., and Shen, Yu -Lin. 2017. "Extreme-value statistics reveal rare failure-critical defects in additive manufacturing". United States. doi:10.1002/adem.201700102.
@article{osti_1343622,
title = {Extreme-value statistics reveal rare failure-critical defects in additive manufacturing},
author = {Boyce, Brad L. and Salzbrenner, Bradley C. and Rodelas, Jeffrey M. and Swiler, Laura P. and Madison, Jonathan D. and Jared, Bradley H. and Shen, Yu -Lin},
abstractNote = {Additive manufacturing enables the rapid, cost effective production of large populations of material test coupons such as tensile bars. By adopting streamlined test methods including ‘drop-in’ grips and non-contact extensometry, testing these large populations becomes more efficient. Unlike hardness tests, the tensile test provides a direct measure of yield strength, flow properties, and ductility, which can be directly incorporated into solid mechanics simulations. In the present work, over 1000 nominally identical tensile tests were used to explore the effect of process variability on the mechanical property distributions of a precipitation hardened stainless steel, 17-4PH, produced by a laser powder bed fusion process, also known as direct metal laser sintering. With this large dataset, rare defects are revealed that affect only ~2% of the population, stemming from a single build lot of material. Lastly, the rare defects caused a substantial loss in ductility and were associated with an interconnected network of porosity.},
doi = {10.1002/adem.201700102},
journal = {Advanced Engineering Materials},
number = 8,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 4
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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