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Title: Workshop on Human Activity at Scale in Earth System Models

Abstract

Changing human activity within a geographical location may have significant influence on the global climate, but that activity must be parameterized in such a way as to allow these high-resolution sub-grid processes to affect global climate within that modeling framework. Additionally, we must have tools that provide decision support and inform local and regional policies regarding mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. The development of next-generation earth system models, that can produce actionable results with minimum uncertainties, depends on understanding global climate change and human activity interactions at policy implementation scales. Unfortunately, at best we currently have only limited schemes for relating high-resolution sectoral emissions to real-time weather, ultimately to become part of larger regions and well-mixed atmosphere. Moreover, even our understanding of meteorological processes at these scales is imperfect. This workshop addresses these shortcomings by providing a forum for discussion of what we know about these processes, what we can model, where we have gaps in these areas and how we can rise to the challenge to fill these gaps.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1343540
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2017/24
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Allen, Melissa R., Aziz, H. M. Abdul, Coletti, Mark A., Kennedy, Joseph H., Nair, Sujithkumar S., and Omitaomu, Olufemi A. Workshop on Human Activity at Scale in Earth System Models. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1343540.
Allen, Melissa R., Aziz, H. M. Abdul, Coletti, Mark A., Kennedy, Joseph H., Nair, Sujithkumar S., & Omitaomu, Olufemi A. Workshop on Human Activity at Scale in Earth System Models. United States. doi:10.2172/1343540.
Allen, Melissa R., Aziz, H. M. Abdul, Coletti, Mark A., Kennedy, Joseph H., Nair, Sujithkumar S., and Omitaomu, Olufemi A. Thu . "Workshop on Human Activity at Scale in Earth System Models". United States. doi:10.2172/1343540. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1343540.
@article{osti_1343540,
title = {Workshop on Human Activity at Scale in Earth System Models},
author = {Allen, Melissa R. and Aziz, H. M. Abdul and Coletti, Mark A. and Kennedy, Joseph H. and Nair, Sujithkumar S. and Omitaomu, Olufemi A.},
abstractNote = {Changing human activity within a geographical location may have significant influence on the global climate, but that activity must be parameterized in such a way as to allow these high-resolution sub-grid processes to affect global climate within that modeling framework. Additionally, we must have tools that provide decision support and inform local and regional policies regarding mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. The development of next-generation earth system models, that can produce actionable results with minimum uncertainties, depends on understanding global climate change and human activity interactions at policy implementation scales. Unfortunately, at best we currently have only limited schemes for relating high-resolution sectoral emissions to real-time weather, ultimately to become part of larger regions and well-mixed atmosphere. Moreover, even our understanding of meteorological processes at these scales is imperfect. This workshop addresses these shortcomings by providing a forum for discussion of what we know about these processes, what we can model, where we have gaps in these areas and how we can rise to the challenge to fill these gaps.},
doi = {10.2172/1343540},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Jan 26 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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