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Title: Assessing the Costs and Benefits of Resilience Investments: Tennessee Valley Authority Case Study

Abstract

This report describes a general approach for assessing climate change vulnerabilities of an electricity system and evaluating the costs and benefits of certain investments that would increase system resilience. It uses Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as a case study, concentrating on the Cumberland River basin area on the northern side of the TVA region. The study focuses in particular on evaluating risks associated with extreme heat wave and drought conditions that could be expected to affect the region by mid-century. Extreme climate event scenarios were developed using a combination of dynamically downscaled output from the Community Earth System Model and historical heat wave and drought conditions in 1993 and 2007, respectively.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis (EPSA), Washington, DC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1343538
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2017/13
EP0100000; PIPE211
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Allen, Melissa R., Wilbanks, Thomas J., Preston, Benjamin L., Kao, Shih-Chieh, and Bradbury, James. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of Resilience Investments: Tennessee Valley Authority Case Study. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1343538.
Allen, Melissa R., Wilbanks, Thomas J., Preston, Benjamin L., Kao, Shih-Chieh, & Bradbury, James. Assessing the Costs and Benefits of Resilience Investments: Tennessee Valley Authority Case Study. United States. doi:10.2172/1343538.
Allen, Melissa R., Wilbanks, Thomas J., Preston, Benjamin L., Kao, Shih-Chieh, and Bradbury, James. Sun . "Assessing the Costs and Benefits of Resilience Investments: Tennessee Valley Authority Case Study". United States. doi:10.2172/1343538. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1343538.
@article{osti_1343538,
title = {Assessing the Costs and Benefits of Resilience Investments: Tennessee Valley Authority Case Study},
author = {Allen, Melissa R. and Wilbanks, Thomas J. and Preston, Benjamin L. and Kao, Shih-Chieh and Bradbury, James},
abstractNote = {This report describes a general approach for assessing climate change vulnerabilities of an electricity system and evaluating the costs and benefits of certain investments that would increase system resilience. It uses Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as a case study, concentrating on the Cumberland River basin area on the northern side of the TVA region. The study focuses in particular on evaluating risks associated with extreme heat wave and drought conditions that could be expected to affect the region by mid-century. Extreme climate event scenarios were developed using a combination of dynamically downscaled output from the Community Earth System Model and historical heat wave and drought conditions in 1993 and 2007, respectively.},
doi = {10.2172/1343538},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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