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Title: Lessons from wind policy in Portugal

Abstract

Wind capacity and generation grew rapidly in several European countries, such as Portugal. Wind power adoption in Portugal began in the early 2000s, incentivized by a continuous feed-in tariff policy mechanism, coupled with public tenders for connection licenses in 2001, 2002, and 2005. These policies led to an enormous success in terms of having a large share of renewables providing electricity services: wind alone accounts today for ~23.5% of electricity demand in Portugal. We explain the reasons wind power became a key part of Portugal's strategy to comply with European Commission climate and energy goals, and provide a detailed review of the wind feed-in tariff mechanism. We describe the actors involved in wind power production growth. We estimate the environmental and energy dependency gains achieved through wind power generation, and highlight the correlation between wind electricity generation and electricity exports. Finally, we compare the Portuguese wind policies with others countries' policy designs and discuss the relevance of a feed-in tariff reform for subsequent wind power additions.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1343397
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5C00-67913
Journal ID: ISSN 0301-4215
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Policy; Journal Volume: 103
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; feed-in tariffs; wind energy; wind policy; Portuguese energy policy

Citation Formats

Peña, Ivonne, L. Azevedo, Inês, and Marcelino Ferreira, Luís António Fialho. Lessons from wind policy in Portugal. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.enpol.2016.11.033.
Peña, Ivonne, L. Azevedo, Inês, & Marcelino Ferreira, Luís António Fialho. Lessons from wind policy in Portugal. United States. doi:10.1016/j.enpol.2016.11.033.
Peña, Ivonne, L. Azevedo, Inês, and Marcelino Ferreira, Luís António Fialho. Sat . "Lessons from wind policy in Portugal". United States. doi:10.1016/j.enpol.2016.11.033.
@article{osti_1343397,
title = {Lessons from wind policy in Portugal},
author = {Peña, Ivonne and L. Azevedo, Inês and Marcelino Ferreira, Luís António Fialho},
abstractNote = {Wind capacity and generation grew rapidly in several European countries, such as Portugal. Wind power adoption in Portugal began in the early 2000s, incentivized by a continuous feed-in tariff policy mechanism, coupled with public tenders for connection licenses in 2001, 2002, and 2005. These policies led to an enormous success in terms of having a large share of renewables providing electricity services: wind alone accounts today for ~23.5% of electricity demand in Portugal. We explain the reasons wind power became a key part of Portugal's strategy to comply with European Commission climate and energy goals, and provide a detailed review of the wind feed-in tariff mechanism. We describe the actors involved in wind power production growth. We estimate the environmental and energy dependency gains achieved through wind power generation, and highlight the correlation between wind electricity generation and electricity exports. Finally, we compare the Portuguese wind policies with others countries' policy designs and discuss the relevance of a feed-in tariff reform for subsequent wind power additions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.enpol.2016.11.033},
journal = {Energy Policy},
number = ,
volume = 103,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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