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Title: Maritime Route Delineation using AIS Data from the Atlantic Coast of the US

Abstract

This study examines maritime routes between ports along the Atlantic coast of the US, utilising Automated Identification System (AIS) data for the years 2010 through 2012. The delineation of vessel routes conducted in this study was motivated by development planned for offshore Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) along the Atlantic coast of the US and the need to evaluate the effect of these development areas on commercial shipping. To this end, available AIS data were processed to generate commercial vessel tracks for individual vessels, though cargo vessels are the focus in this study. The individual vessel tracks were sampled at transects placed along the Atlantic coast. The transect samples were analysed and partitioned by voyages between Atlantic ports to facilitate computation of vessel routes between ports. The route boundary analysis utilised a definition from UK guidance in which routes' boundaries encompassed 95% of the vessel traffic between ports. In addition to delineating route boundaries, we found multi-modal transverse distributions of vessels for well-travelled routes, which indicated preference for lanes of travel within the delineated routes.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1343172
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-120338
Journal ID: ISSN 0373-4633; 400406000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Navigation; Journal Volume: 70; Journal Issue: 02
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Marine Traffic; Coastal; Wind Energy Areas

Citation Formats

Breithaupt, Stephen A., Copping, Andrea, Tagestad, Jerry, and Whiting, Jonathan. Maritime Route Delineation using AIS Data from the Atlantic Coast of the US. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1017/S0373463316000606.
Breithaupt, Stephen A., Copping, Andrea, Tagestad, Jerry, & Whiting, Jonathan. Maritime Route Delineation using AIS Data from the Atlantic Coast of the US. United States. doi:10.1017/S0373463316000606.
Breithaupt, Stephen A., Copping, Andrea, Tagestad, Jerry, and Whiting, Jonathan. 2016. "Maritime Route Delineation using AIS Data from the Atlantic Coast of the US". United States. doi:10.1017/S0373463316000606.
@article{osti_1343172,
title = {Maritime Route Delineation using AIS Data from the Atlantic Coast of the US},
author = {Breithaupt, Stephen A. and Copping, Andrea and Tagestad, Jerry and Whiting, Jonathan},
abstractNote = {This study examines maritime routes between ports along the Atlantic coast of the US, utilising Automated Identification System (AIS) data for the years 2010 through 2012. The delineation of vessel routes conducted in this study was motivated by development planned for offshore Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) along the Atlantic coast of the US and the need to evaluate the effect of these development areas on commercial shipping. To this end, available AIS data were processed to generate commercial vessel tracks for individual vessels, though cargo vessels are the focus in this study. The individual vessel tracks were sampled at transects placed along the Atlantic coast. The transect samples were analysed and partitioned by voyages between Atlantic ports to facilitate computation of vessel routes between ports. The route boundary analysis utilised a definition from UK guidance in which routes' boundaries encompassed 95% of the vessel traffic between ports. In addition to delineating route boundaries, we found multi-modal transverse distributions of vessels for well-travelled routes, which indicated preference for lanes of travel within the delineated routes.},
doi = {10.1017/S0373463316000606},
journal = {Journal of Navigation},
number = 02,
volume = 70,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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