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Title: S&TR Preview: Making an Impact on Asteroid Deflection

Abstract

Livermore researchers prepare for a full-scale asteroid deflection experiment using computer simulations.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1343114
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; ASTEROIDS; EARTH; ASTEROID IMPACT; KINETIC IMPACT METHOD; DART; DOUBLE ASTEROID REDIRECTION TEST; DART MISSION

Citation Formats

Syal, Megan Bruck. S&TR Preview: Making an Impact on Asteroid Deflection. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Syal, Megan Bruck. S&TR Preview: Making an Impact on Asteroid Deflection. United States.
Syal, Megan Bruck. Thu . "S&TR Preview: Making an Impact on Asteroid Deflection". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1343114.
@article{osti_1343114,
title = {S&TR Preview: Making an Impact on Asteroid Deflection},
author = {Syal, Megan Bruck},
abstractNote = {Livermore researchers prepare for a full-scale asteroid deflection experiment using computer simulations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Feb 02 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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