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Title: Beam-dynamics codes used at DARHT

Abstract

Several beam simulation codes are used to help gain a better understanding of beam dynamics in the DARHT LIAs. The most notable of these fall into the following categories: for beam production – Tricomp Trak orbit tracking code, LSP Particle in cell (PIC) code, for beam transport and acceleration – XTR static envelope and centroid code, LAMDA time-resolved envelope and centroid code, LSP-Slice PIC code, for coasting-beam transport to target – LAMDA time-resolved envelope code, LSP-Slice PIC code. These codes are also being used to inform the design of Scorpius.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1342829
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-20723
TRN: US1701907
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; BEAM DYNAMICS; BEAMS; BEAM TRANSPORT; BEAM PRODUCTION; SIMULATION

Citation Formats

Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August. Beam-dynamics codes used at DARHT. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1342829.
Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August. Beam-dynamics codes used at DARHT. United States. doi:10.2172/1342829.
Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August. Wed . "Beam-dynamics codes used at DARHT". United States. doi:10.2172/1342829. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1342829.
@article{osti_1342829,
title = {Beam-dynamics codes used at DARHT},
author = {Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August},
abstractNote = {Several beam simulation codes are used to help gain a better understanding of beam dynamics in the DARHT LIAs. The most notable of these fall into the following categories: for beam production – Tricomp Trak orbit tracking code, LSP Particle in cell (PIC) code, for beam transport and acceleration – XTR static envelope and centroid code, LAMDA time-resolved envelope and centroid code, LSP-Slice PIC code, for coasting-beam transport to target – LAMDA time-resolved envelope code, LSP-Slice PIC code. These codes are also being used to inform the design of Scorpius.},
doi = {10.2172/1342829},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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