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Title: Microfabricated systems and assays for studying the cytoskeletal organization, micromechanics, and motility patterns of cancerous cells

Abstract

Cell motions are driven by coordinated actions of the intracellular cytoskeleton – actin, microtubules (MTs) and substrate/focal adhesions (FAs). This coordination is altered in metastatic cancer cells resulting in deregulated and increased cellular motility. Microfabrication tools, including photolithography, micromolding, microcontact printing, wet stamping and microfluidic devices have emerged as a powerful set of experimental tools with which to probe and define the differences in cytoskeleton organization/dynamics and cell motility patterns in non-metastatic and metastatic cancer cells. In this paper, we discuss four categories of microfabricated systems: (i) micropatterned substrates for studying of cell motility sub-processes (for example, MT targeting of FAs or cell polarization); (ii) systems for studying cell mechanical properties, (iii) systems for probing overall cell motility patterns within challenging geometric confines relevant to metastasis (for example, linear and ratchet geometries), and (iv) microfluidic devices that incorporate co-cultures of multiple cell types and chemical gradients to mimic in vivo intravasation/extravasation steps of metastasis. Finally, together, these systems allow for creating controlled microenvironments that not only mimic complex soft tissues, but are also compatible with live cell high-resolution imaging and quantitative analysis of single cell behavior.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1342725
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0000989
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Materials Interfaces
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2196-7350
Publisher:
Wiley-VCH
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; cytoskeleton; cell motility; micropatterning; microfabrication; cancer metastasis

Citation Formats

Huda, Sabil, Pilans, Didzis, Makurath, Monika, Hermans, Thomas M., Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana, and Grzybowski, Bartosz A.. Microfabricated systems and assays for studying the cytoskeletal organization, micromechanics, and motility patterns of cancerous cells. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1002/admi.201400158.
Huda, Sabil, Pilans, Didzis, Makurath, Monika, Hermans, Thomas M., Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana, & Grzybowski, Bartosz A.. Microfabricated systems and assays for studying the cytoskeletal organization, micromechanics, and motility patterns of cancerous cells. United States. doi:10.1002/admi.201400158.
Huda, Sabil, Pilans, Didzis, Makurath, Monika, Hermans, Thomas M., Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana, and Grzybowski, Bartosz A.. Thu . "Microfabricated systems and assays for studying the cytoskeletal organization, micromechanics, and motility patterns of cancerous cells". United States. doi:10.1002/admi.201400158. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1342725.
@article{osti_1342725,
title = {Microfabricated systems and assays for studying the cytoskeletal organization, micromechanics, and motility patterns of cancerous cells},
author = {Huda, Sabil and Pilans, Didzis and Makurath, Monika and Hermans, Thomas M. and Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana and Grzybowski, Bartosz A.},
abstractNote = {Cell motions are driven by coordinated actions of the intracellular cytoskeleton – actin, microtubules (MTs) and substrate/focal adhesions (FAs). This coordination is altered in metastatic cancer cells resulting in deregulated and increased cellular motility. Microfabrication tools, including photolithography, micromolding, microcontact printing, wet stamping and microfluidic devices have emerged as a powerful set of experimental tools with which to probe and define the differences in cytoskeleton organization/dynamics and cell motility patterns in non-metastatic and metastatic cancer cells. In this paper, we discuss four categories of microfabricated systems: (i) micropatterned substrates for studying of cell motility sub-processes (for example, MT targeting of FAs or cell polarization); (ii) systems for studying cell mechanical properties, (iii) systems for probing overall cell motility patterns within challenging geometric confines relevant to metastasis (for example, linear and ratchet geometries), and (iv) microfluidic devices that incorporate co-cultures of multiple cell types and chemical gradients to mimic in vivo intravasation/extravasation steps of metastasis. Finally, together, these systems allow for creating controlled microenvironments that not only mimic complex soft tissues, but are also compatible with live cell high-resolution imaging and quantitative analysis of single cell behavior.},
doi = {10.1002/admi.201400158},
journal = {Advanced Materials Interfaces},
number = 7,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Aug 28 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Thu Aug 28 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

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