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Title: 2015 South Carolina PV Soft Cost and Workforce Development Part 2: Six Month Confirmation of Anticipated Job Growth

Abstract

In 2015, a program was initiated to carefully track and monitor the growth of the solar industry in SC. Prior to then, little information was available on the costs associated with distributed photovoltaic (PV) installations in the Southeastern US. For this report, data were collected from businesses on the number of hires they had at the end of 2014 and compared with data for 2015 and June 2016. It was found that the percentage of installers within the state who serve the residential sector increased to 82% from 67%. During the same time period, the average size of initiated installations for residential, commercial, and utility scale installations all trended upwards. Where residential installations were typically 5 kW-DC in 2014, they were typically 10 kW-DC by late 2015 and in mid-2016. For commercial installations, the average size grew from 84 kW-DC in 2014 to between 136-236 kW-DC in 2015 and then 188-248 kWDC in mid-2016. An exception was seen in utility scale installations where a 2.3 MW-DC system was common in 2014, the size grew to be 5-15 MW-DC in late 2015. The average size dropped 3.1-4.4 MWDC in mid-June 2016, though individual averages up to 20 MW-DC were reported.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1342716
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2017-00039
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; solar; soft cost; residential; commercial; utility; PV

Citation Formats

Fox, Elise B., and Edwards, Thomas B. 2015 South Carolina PV Soft Cost and Workforce Development Part 2: Six Month Confirmation of Anticipated Job Growth. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1342716.
Fox, Elise B., & Edwards, Thomas B. 2015 South Carolina PV Soft Cost and Workforce Development Part 2: Six Month Confirmation of Anticipated Job Growth. United States. doi:10.2172/1342716.
Fox, Elise B., and Edwards, Thomas B. Tue . "2015 South Carolina PV Soft Cost and Workforce Development Part 2: Six Month Confirmation of Anticipated Job Growth". United States. doi:10.2172/1342716. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1342716.
@article{osti_1342716,
title = {2015 South Carolina PV Soft Cost and Workforce Development Part 2: Six Month Confirmation of Anticipated Job Growth},
author = {Fox, Elise B. and Edwards, Thomas B.},
abstractNote = {In 2015, a program was initiated to carefully track and monitor the growth of the solar industry in SC. Prior to then, little information was available on the costs associated with distributed photovoltaic (PV) installations in the Southeastern US. For this report, data were collected from businesses on the number of hires they had at the end of 2014 and compared with data for 2015 and June 2016. It was found that the percentage of installers within the state who serve the residential sector increased to 82% from 67%. During the same time period, the average size of initiated installations for residential, commercial, and utility scale installations all trended upwards. Where residential installations were typically 5 kW-DC in 2014, they were typically 10 kW-DC by late 2015 and in mid-2016. For commercial installations, the average size grew from 84 kW-DC in 2014 to between 136-236 kW-DC in 2015 and then 188-248 kWDC in mid-2016. An exception was seen in utility scale installations where a 2.3 MW-DC system was common in 2014, the size grew to be 5-15 MW-DC in late 2015. The average size dropped 3.1-4.4 MWDC in mid-June 2016, though individual averages up to 20 MW-DC were reported.},
doi = {10.2172/1342716},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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