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Title: Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans

Abstract

Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved with good accuracy. Furthermore, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [2];  [6]
  1. The Univ. of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States)
  2. Earth Sciences Research Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)
  3. Univ. of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), Baltimore, MD (United States)
  4. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
  5. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  6. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1342620
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1345714
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5000-68054
Journal ID: ISSN 1867-8548
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308; AFA-5-52027-01
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (Online); Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1867-8548
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; wind lidars; XPIA; wind velocity; vertical profiles

Citation Formats

Debnath, Mithu, Iungo, G. Valerio, Ashton, Ryan, Brewer, W. Alan, Choukulkar, Aditya, Delgado, Ruben, Lundquist, Julie K., Shaw, William J., Wilczak, James M., and Wolfe, Daniel. Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.5194/amt-10-431-2017.
Debnath, Mithu, Iungo, G. Valerio, Ashton, Ryan, Brewer, W. Alan, Choukulkar, Aditya, Delgado, Ruben, Lundquist, Julie K., Shaw, William J., Wilczak, James M., & Wolfe, Daniel. Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans. United States. doi:10.5194/amt-10-431-2017.
Debnath, Mithu, Iungo, G. Valerio, Ashton, Ryan, Brewer, W. Alan, Choukulkar, Aditya, Delgado, Ruben, Lundquist, Julie K., Shaw, William J., Wilczak, James M., and Wolfe, Daniel. Mon . "Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans". United States. doi:10.5194/amt-10-431-2017.
@article{osti_1342620,
title = {Vertical profiles of the 3-D wind velocity retrieved from multiple wind lidars performing triple range-height-indicator scans},
author = {Debnath, Mithu and Iungo, G. Valerio and Ashton, Ryan and Brewer, W. Alan and Choukulkar, Aditya and Delgado, Ruben and Lundquist, Julie K. and Shaw, William J. and Wilczak, James M. and Wolfe, Daniel},
abstractNote = {Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved with good accuracy. Furthermore, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.},
doi = {10.5194/amt-10-431-2017},
journal = {Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (Online)},
number = 2,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 06 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.5194/amt-10-431-2017

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
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  • Vertical profiles of 3-D wind velocity are retrieved from triple range-height-indicator (RHI) scans performed with multiple simultaneous scanning Doppler wind lidars. This test is part of the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA) campaign carried out at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory. The three wind velocity components are retrieved and then compared with the data acquired through various profiling wind lidars and high-frequency wind data obtained from sonic anemometers installed on a 300 m meteorological tower. The results show that the magnitude of the horizontal wind velocity and the wind direction obtained from the triple RHI scans are generally retrieved withmore » good accuracy. Furthermore, poor accuracy is obtained for the evaluation of the vertical velocity, which is mainly due to its typically smaller magnitude and to the error propagation connected with the data retrieval procedure and accuracy in the experimental setup.« less
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