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Title: Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts: What Have We Learned from the USGS CoalQual Database?

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV (United States). In-house Research
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1342507
Report Number(s):
NETL-PUB-20285
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ACS Meeting 08-22-2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
REE coal and coal byproducts

Citation Formats

Lin, Ronghong, and Soong, Yee. Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts: What Have We Learned from the USGS CoalQual Database?. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Lin, Ronghong, & Soong, Yee. Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts: What Have We Learned from the USGS CoalQual Database?. United States.
Lin, Ronghong, and Soong, Yee. 2016. "Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts: What Have We Learned from the USGS CoalQual Database?". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1342507.
@article{osti_1342507,
title = {Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts: What Have We Learned from the USGS CoalQual Database?},
author = {Lin, Ronghong and Soong, Yee},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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