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Title: Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology Facility Expedites Manufacturing Innovation

Abstract

The Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology facility (CoMET) at the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) paves the way for innovative wind turbine components and accelerated manufacturing. Available for use by industry partners and university researchers, the 10,000-square-foot facility expands NREL's composite manufacturing research capabilities by enabling researchers to design, prototype, and test composite wind turbine blades and other components -- and then manufacture them onsite. Designed to work in conjunction with NREL's design, analysis, and structural testing capabilities, the CoMET facility expedites manufacturing innovation.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1342502
Report Number(s):
NREL/FS-5000-67761
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; composite manufacturing; onsite manufacturing; wind turbine component manufacturing; accelerated manufacturing; CoMET; IACMI; National Wind Technology Center

Citation Formats

. Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology Facility Expedites Manufacturing Innovation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
. Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology Facility Expedites Manufacturing Innovation. United States.
. Sun . "Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology Facility Expedites Manufacturing Innovation". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1342502.
@article{osti_1342502,
title = {Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology Facility Expedites Manufacturing Innovation},
author = {},
abstractNote = {The Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology facility (CoMET) at the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) paves the way for innovative wind turbine components and accelerated manufacturing. Available for use by industry partners and university researchers, the 10,000-square-foot facility expands NREL's composite manufacturing research capabilities by enabling researchers to design, prototype, and test composite wind turbine blades and other components -- and then manufacture them onsite. Designed to work in conjunction with NREL's design, analysis, and structural testing capabilities, the CoMET facility expedites manufacturing innovation.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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