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Title: Guide to Cybersecurity, Resilience, and Reliability for Small and Under-Resourced Utilities

Abstract

Small electricity utilities -- those with less than 100 employees or 50,000 meters -- provide essential services to large parts of the United States while facing a number of challenges unique to their mission. For instance, they often serve areas that are sparsely populated, meaning that their per-customer cost to provide service is higher. At the same time, they often serve customers that have moderate or fixed incomes, meaning that they are under strong pressure to keep costs down. This pressure puts them on a strict budget and creates a need for innovative solutions to common problems. Further, their service areas may include extreme climates, making severe weather events more frequent and their aftermaths more expensive to address. This guide considers challenges that small utilities face while ensuring the reliability, resilience, and cybersecurity of their electric service; approaches to address those challenges using existing guidance documents; ways that the federal government could provide support in these areas.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Policy and Systems Analysis (EPSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1342373
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5C00-67669
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; cybersecurity; electricity; utilities; reliability; resilience

Citation Formats

Ingram, Michael, and Martin, Maurice. Guide to Cybersecurity, Resilience, and Reliability for Small and Under-Resourced Utilities. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1342373.
Ingram, Michael, & Martin, Maurice. Guide to Cybersecurity, Resilience, and Reliability for Small and Under-Resourced Utilities. United States. doi:10.2172/1342373.
Ingram, Michael, and Martin, Maurice. Sun . "Guide to Cybersecurity, Resilience, and Reliability for Small and Under-Resourced Utilities". United States. doi:10.2172/1342373. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1342373.
@article{osti_1342373,
title = {Guide to Cybersecurity, Resilience, and Reliability for Small and Under-Resourced Utilities},
author = {Ingram, Michael and Martin, Maurice},
abstractNote = {Small electricity utilities -- those with less than 100 employees or 50,000 meters -- provide essential services to large parts of the United States while facing a number of challenges unique to their mission. For instance, they often serve areas that are sparsely populated, meaning that their per-customer cost to provide service is higher. At the same time, they often serve customers that have moderate or fixed incomes, meaning that they are under strong pressure to keep costs down. This pressure puts them on a strict budget and creates a need for innovative solutions to common problems. Further, their service areas may include extreme climates, making severe weather events more frequent and their aftermaths more expensive to address. This guide considers challenges that small utilities face while ensuring the reliability, resilience, and cybersecurity of their electric service; approaches to address those challenges using existing guidance documents; ways that the federal government could provide support in these areas.},
doi = {10.2172/1342373},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This report covers systems performance and cost data for selected smaller cogeneration systems, which are defined generally as those cogeneration systems in the range below 5 megawatts. The data presented in this guide are expected to be used in two main ways. First, the data can be used to extend the existing DEUS Computer Evaluation Model data base to the smaller cogeneration systems. Second, the data will serve as a general guide to smaller cogeneration systems for use by the utilities companies and others. The data pertain to the following cogeneration system: gas turbine with heat recovery boiler, back pressuremore » and extraction/condensing steam turbine, combined cycle, internal combustion (reciprocating) engine, steam bottoming cycle using industrial process exhaust, and gas turbine topping cycle with standard industrial process steam generators. A no-cogeneration base case is included for comparison purposes.« less
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  • As energy technology increases and the price of energy continues to rise, energy production by individuals, small businesses, and industrial firms has become feasible. The attractiveness of the venture has been enhanced by the Congressional passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), one of the five acts which compose the National Energy Acts of 1978. Basically, PURPA requires regulated Public Utilities to purchase excess power from qualifying facilities. PURPA also requires utilities to provide standby power at reasonable rates, and allow parallel interconnection with the common electric grid. In 1979, FERC issued regulations which require themore » state regulatory agencies to implement guidelines based on PURPA. Even though a few states are now just beginning rate hearings on PURPA, the majority of the states and Public Utilities in the nation have established separate rate tariffs specifically designated for cogeneration facilities. A task team has compiled this listing of PURPA cogeneration rates. This listing contains information pertaining to nearly all of the nation's largest utility companies involved in the production of electricity. The data sites listed in this document are SOLCOST Data Bank Cities.« less
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