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Title: Testing the Feasibility of a Low-Cost Network Performance Measurement Infrastructure

Abstract

Todays science collaborations depend on reliable, high performance networks, but monitoring the end-to-end performance of a network can be costly and difficult. The most accurate approaches involve using measurement equipment in many locations, which can be both expensive and difficult to manage due to immobile or complicated assets. The perfSONAR framework facilitates network measurement making management of the tests more reasonable. Traditional deployments have used over-provisioned servers, which can be expensive to deploy and maintain. As scientific network uses proliferate, there is a desire to instrument more facets of a network to better understand trends. This work explores low cost alternatives to assist with network measurement. Benefits include the ability to deploy more resources quickly, and reduced capital and operating expenditures. Finally, we present candidate platforms and a testing scenario that evaluated the relative merits of four types of small form factor equipment to deliver accurate performance measurements.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). International Networks
  2. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Telecommunications and Networking Services
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Sciences Network
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1342228
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1005797
ir:1005797
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231; 0962973
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chevalier, Scott, Schopf, Jennifer M., Miller, Kenneth, and Zurawski, Jason. Testing the Feasibility of a Low-Cost Network Performance Measurement Infrastructure. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1342228.
Chevalier, Scott, Schopf, Jennifer M., Miller, Kenneth, & Zurawski, Jason. Testing the Feasibility of a Low-Cost Network Performance Measurement Infrastructure. United States. doi:10.2172/1342228.
Chevalier, Scott, Schopf, Jennifer M., Miller, Kenneth, and Zurawski, Jason. 2016. "Testing the Feasibility of a Low-Cost Network Performance Measurement Infrastructure". United States. doi:10.2172/1342228. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1342228.
@article{osti_1342228,
title = {Testing the Feasibility of a Low-Cost Network Performance Measurement Infrastructure},
author = {Chevalier, Scott and Schopf, Jennifer M. and Miller, Kenneth and Zurawski, Jason},
abstractNote = {Todays science collaborations depend on reliable, high performance networks, but monitoring the end-to-end performance of a network can be costly and difficult. The most accurate approaches involve using measurement equipment in many locations, which can be both expensive and difficult to manage due to immobile or complicated assets. The perfSONAR framework facilitates network measurement making management of the tests more reasonable. Traditional deployments have used over-provisioned servers, which can be expensive to deploy and maintain. As scientific network uses proliferate, there is a desire to instrument more facets of a network to better understand trends. This work explores low cost alternatives to assist with network measurement. Benefits include the ability to deploy more resources quickly, and reduced capital and operating expenditures. Finally, we present candidate platforms and a testing scenario that evaluated the relative merits of four types of small form factor equipment to deliver accurate performance measurements.},
doi = {10.2172/1342228},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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