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Title: Production of bio-based materials using photobioreactors with binary cultures

Abstract

A method, device and system for producing preselected products, (either finished products or preselected intermediary products) from biobased precursors or CO.sub.2 and/or bicarbonate. The principal features of the present invention include a method wherein a binary culture is incubated with a biobased precursor in a closed system to transform at least a portion of the biobased precursor to a preselected product. The present invention provides a method of cultivation that does not need sparging of a closed bioreactor to remove or add a gaseous byproduct or nutrient from a liquid medium. This improvement leads to significant savings in energy consumption and allows for the design of photobioreactors of any desired shape. The present invention also allows for the use of a variety of types of waste materials to be used as the organic starting material.

Inventors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1342099
Patent Number(s):
9,556,456
Application Number:
12/858,338
Assignee:
Battelle Memorial Institute (Richland, WA) PNNL
DOE Contract Number:
AC0576RL01830
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 2010 Aug 17
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Beliaev, Alex S., Pinchuk, Grigoriy E., and Hill, Eric A. Production of bio-based materials using photobioreactors with binary cultures. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Beliaev, Alex S., Pinchuk, Grigoriy E., & Hill, Eric A. Production of bio-based materials using photobioreactors with binary cultures. United States.
Beliaev, Alex S., Pinchuk, Grigoriy E., and Hill, Eric A. Tue . "Production of bio-based materials using photobioreactors with binary cultures". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1342099.
@article{osti_1342099,
title = {Production of bio-based materials using photobioreactors with binary cultures},
author = {Beliaev, Alex S. and Pinchuk, Grigoriy E. and Hill, Eric A.},
abstractNote = {A method, device and system for producing preselected products, (either finished products or preselected intermediary products) from biobased precursors or CO.sub.2 and/or bicarbonate. The principal features of the present invention include a method wherein a binary culture is incubated with a biobased precursor in a closed system to transform at least a portion of the biobased precursor to a preselected product. The present invention provides a method of cultivation that does not need sparging of a closed bioreactor to remove or add a gaseous byproduct or nutrient from a liquid medium. This improvement leads to significant savings in energy consumption and allows for the design of photobioreactors of any desired shape. The present invention also allows for the use of a variety of types of waste materials to be used as the organic starting material.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Patent:

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  • A method, device and system for producing preselected products, (either finished products or preselected intermediary products) from biobased precursors or CO.sub.2 and/or bicarbonate. The principal features of the present invention include a method wherein a binary culture is incubated with a biobased precursor in a closed system to transform at least a portion of the biobased precursor to a preselected product. The present invention provides a method of cultivation that does not need sparging of a closed bioreactor to remove or add a gaseous byproduct or nutrient from a liquid medium. This improvement leads to significant savings in energy consumptionmore » and allows for the design of photobioreactors of any desired shape. The present invention also allows for the use of a variety of types of waste materials to be used as the organic starting material.« less
  • Two innovative culturing systems, the LED-lighted and temperature-controlled 800 liter indoor raceways at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Phenometrics environmental Photobioreactors™ (ePBRs) were evaluated in terms of their ability to accurately simulate the microalgae growth performance of outdoor cultures subjected to fluctuating sunlight and water temperature conditions. When repeating a 60-day outdoor pond culture experiment (batch and semi-continuous at two dilution rates) conducted in Arizona with the freshwater strain Chlorella sorokiniana DOE 1412 in these two indoor simulators, it was found that ash-free dry weight based biomass growth and productivity in the PNNL climate-simulation ponds was comparatively slightlymore » higher (8–13%) but significantly lower (44%) in the ePBRs. The difference in biomass productivities between the indoor and outdoor ponds was not statistically significant. When the marine Picochlorum soloecismus was cultured in five replicate ePBRs at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and in duplicate indoor climate-simulation ponds at PNNL, using the same inoculum, medium, culture depth, and light and temperature scripts, the optical density based biomass productivity and the rate of increase in cell counts in the ePBRs was about 35% and 66%, respectively, lower compared than in the indoor ponds. Potential reasons for the divergence in growth performance in these pond simulators, relative to outdoor raceways, are discussed. In conclusion, the PNNL climate-simulation ponds provide reasonably reliable biomass productivity estimates for microalgae strains cultured in outdoor raceways under different climatic conditions.« less
  • Two innovative culturing systems, the LED-lighted and temperature-controlled 800 liter indoor raceways at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Phenometrics photobioreactors (ePBRs) were evaluated in terms of their ability to accurately simulate the microalgae growth performance of outdoor cultures subjected to fluctuating sunlight and water temperature conditions. When repeating a 60 day long outdoor pond culture experiment (batch and sem-continuous at two dilution rates) conducted in Arizona with the freshwater strain Chlorella sorokiniana DOE 1412 in these two indoor simulators, it was found that biomass growth and productivity in the PNNL climate-simulation ponds was comparatively slightly higher (10-15%) butmore » significantly lower (52-62%) in the ePBRs. Similarly, when the marine Picochlorum sp. was cultured in six replicate ePBRs at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and duplicate climate-simulation ponds at PNNL, using the same inoculum, medium, culture depth, and light and temperature scripts, the biomass productivity in the ePBRs was only about 65% of that observed in PNNL’s indoor ponds. Potential reasons for the divergence in growth performance in these pond simulators, relative to outdoor raceways, are discussed. In conclusion, the PNNL climate-simulation ponds provide reasonably reliable biomass productivity estimates for microalgae strains cultured in outdoor raceways under different climatic conditions.« less
  • Two innovative culturing systems, the LED-lighted and temperature-controlled 800 liter indoor raceways at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Phenometrics environmental Photobioreactors™ (ePBRs) were evaluated in terms of their ability to accurately simulate the microalgae growth performance of outdoor cultures subjected to fluctuating sunlight and water temperature conditions. When repeating a 60-day outdoor pond culture experiment (batch and semi-continuous at two dilution rates) conducted in Arizona with the freshwater strain Chlorella sorokiniana DOE 1412 in these two indoor simulators, it was found that ash-free dry weight based biomass growth and productivity in the PNNL climate-simulation ponds was comparatively slightlymore » higher (8–13%) but significantly lower (44%) in the ePBRs. The difference in biomass productivities between the indoor and outdoor ponds was not statistically significant. When the marine Picochlorum soloecismus was cultured in five replicate ePBRs at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and in duplicate indoor climate-simulation ponds at PNNL, using the same inoculum, medium, culture depth, and light and temperature scripts, the optical density based biomass productivity and the rate of increase in cell counts in the ePBRs was about 35% and 66%, respectively, lower compared than in the indoor ponds. Potential reasons for the divergence in growth performance in these pond simulators, relative to outdoor raceways, are discussed. In conclusion, the PNNL climate-simulation ponds provide reasonably reliable biomass productivity estimates for microalgae strains cultured in outdoor raceways under different climatic conditions.« less
    Cited by 3
  • This invention presents a method for the production of ethanol that utilizes a soy hydrolysate-based nutrient medium or a yeast autolysate-based medium nutrient medium in conjunction with ethanologenic bacteria and a fermentable sugar for the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. The invention offers several advantages over presently available media for use in ethanol production, including consistent quality, lack of toxins and wide availability.