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Title: Nanoconfinement platform for nanostructure quantification via grazing-transmission X-ray scattering

Abstract

A nano-confinement platform that may allow improved quantification of the structural order of nanometer-scale systems. Sample-holder `chips` are designed for the GTSAXS experimental geometry. The platform involves fabricated nanostructured sample holders on and in one or more corners of a substrate support where the sample material of interest is positioned at the corner of the substrate support. In an embodiment, the substrate material making up the substrate support beneath the sample-holding area is removed. A scattering x-ray sample platform includes a substrate support arranged in a parallelepiped form, having a substantially flat base and a substantially flat top surface, the top surface being substantially parallel with the base, the parallelepiped having a plurality of corners. At least one corner of the substrate support has a sample holding area formed in the top surface of the substrate support and within a predetermined distance from the corner. The sample holding area includes a regular array of nano-wells formed in the top surface of the substrate support.

Inventors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1341887
Patent Number(s):
9,557,283
Application Number:
14/713,081
Assignee:
Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC (Upton, NY) BNL
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-98CH10886; SC0012704
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 2015 Mar 15
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Black, Charles T., and Yager, Kevin G. Nanoconfinement platform for nanostructure quantification via grazing-transmission X-ray scattering. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Black, Charles T., & Yager, Kevin G. Nanoconfinement platform for nanostructure quantification via grazing-transmission X-ray scattering. United States.
Black, Charles T., and Yager, Kevin G. Tue . "Nanoconfinement platform for nanostructure quantification via grazing-transmission X-ray scattering". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1341887.
@article{osti_1341887,
title = {Nanoconfinement platform for nanostructure quantification via grazing-transmission X-ray scattering},
author = {Black, Charles T. and Yager, Kevin G.},
abstractNote = {A nano-confinement platform that may allow improved quantification of the structural order of nanometer-scale systems. Sample-holder `chips` are designed for the GTSAXS experimental geometry. The platform involves fabricated nanostructured sample holders on and in one or more corners of a substrate support where the sample material of interest is positioned at the corner of the substrate support. In an embodiment, the substrate material making up the substrate support beneath the sample-holding area is removed. A scattering x-ray sample platform includes a substrate support arranged in a parallelepiped form, having a substantially flat base and a substantially flat top surface, the top surface being substantially parallel with the base, the parallelepiped having a plurality of corners. At least one corner of the substrate support has a sample holding area formed in the top surface of the substrate support and within a predetermined distance from the corner. The sample holding area includes a regular array of nano-wells formed in the top surface of the substrate support.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Patent:

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