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Title: An international survey of building energy codes and their implementation

Abstract

Buildings are key to low-carbon development everywhere, and many countries have introduced building energy codes to improve energy efficiency in buildings. Yet, building energy codes can only deliver results when the codes are implemented. For this reason, studies of building energy codes need to consider implementation of building energy codes in a consistent and comprehensive way. This research identifies elements and practices in implementing building energy codes, covering codes in 22 countries that account for 70% of global energy use in buildings. These elements and practices include: comprehensive coverage of buildings by type, age, size, and geographic location; an implementation framework that involves a certified agency to inspect construction at critical stages; and building materials that are independently tested, rated, and labeled. Training and supporting tools are another element of successful code implementation. Some countries have also introduced compliance evaluation studies, which suggested that tightening energy requirements would only be meaningful when also addressing gaps in implementation (Pitt&Sherry, 2014; U.S. DOE, 2016b). Here, this article provides examples of practices that countries have adopted to assist with implementation of building energy codes.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1341745
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-118463
Journal ID: ISSN 0959-6526; PII: S0959652617300057
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Cleaner Production
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 158; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0959-6526
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; Building energy codes; Thermal building regulations; Code implementation; Building energy efficiency; International building energy

Citation Formats

Evans, Meredydd, Roshchanka, Volha, and Graham, Peter. An international survey of building energy codes and their implementation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.007.
Evans, Meredydd, Roshchanka, Volha, & Graham, Peter. An international survey of building energy codes and their implementation. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.007.
Evans, Meredydd, Roshchanka, Volha, and Graham, Peter. 2017. "An international survey of building energy codes and their implementation". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.007.
@article{osti_1341745,
title = {An international survey of building energy codes and their implementation},
author = {Evans, Meredydd and Roshchanka, Volha and Graham, Peter},
abstractNote = {Buildings are key to low-carbon development everywhere, and many countries have introduced building energy codes to improve energy efficiency in buildings. Yet, building energy codes can only deliver results when the codes are implemented. For this reason, studies of building energy codes need to consider implementation of building energy codes in a consistent and comprehensive way. This research identifies elements and practices in implementing building energy codes, covering codes in 22 countries that account for 70% of global energy use in buildings. These elements and practices include: comprehensive coverage of buildings by type, age, size, and geographic location; an implementation framework that involves a certified agency to inspect construction at critical stages; and building materials that are independently tested, rated, and labeled. Training and supporting tools are another element of successful code implementation. Some countries have also introduced compliance evaluation studies, which suggested that tightening energy requirements would only be meaningful when also addressing gaps in implementation (Pitt&Sherry, 2014; U.S. DOE, 2016b). Here, this article provides examples of practices that countries have adopted to assist with implementation of building energy codes.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.01.007},
journal = {Journal of Cleaner Production},
number = C,
volume = 158,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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