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Title: High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source

Abstract

Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this article reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO 2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized at 5- and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. Lastly, with the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. RadiaBeam Technologies, LLC., Santa Monica, CA (United States)
  2. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  4. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25); U.S. Department of Homeland Security
OSTI Identifier:
1341708
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1364069
Report Number(s):
BNL-113459-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951; R&D Project: KBCH139; KB0202011; TRN: US1701101
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704; SC0007703; AC02-98CH10886; 2014-DN-077-ARI084-01
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 109; Journal Issue: 25; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

Citation Formats

Ovodenko, A., Agustsson, R., Babzien, M., Campese, T., Fedurin, M., Murokh, A., Pogorelsky, I., Polyanskiy, M., Rosenzweig, J., Sakai, Y., Shaftan, T., and Swinson, C. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4972344.
Ovodenko, A., Agustsson, R., Babzien, M., Campese, T., Fedurin, M., Murokh, A., Pogorelsky, I., Polyanskiy, M., Rosenzweig, J., Sakai, Y., Shaftan, T., & Swinson, C. High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4972344.
Ovodenko, A., Agustsson, R., Babzien, M., Campese, T., Fedurin, M., Murokh, A., Pogorelsky, I., Polyanskiy, M., Rosenzweig, J., Sakai, Y., Shaftan, T., and Swinson, C. Thu . "High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4972344. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1341708.
@article{osti_1341708,
title = {High duty cycle inverse Compton scattering X-ray source},
author = {Ovodenko, A. and Agustsson, R. and Babzien, M. and Campese, T. and Fedurin, M. and Murokh, A. and Pogorelsky, I. and Polyanskiy, M. and Rosenzweig, J. and Sakai, Y. and Shaftan, T. and Swinson, C.},
abstractNote = {Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) is an emerging compact X-ray source technology, where the small source size and high spectral brightness are of interest for multitude of applications. However, to satisfy the practical flux requirements, a high-repetition-rate ICS system needs to be developed. To this end, this article reports the experimental demonstration of a high peak brightness ICS source operating in a burst mode at 40 MHz. A pulse train interaction has been achieved by recirculating a picosecond CO2 laser pulse inside an active optical cavity synchronized to the electron beam. The pulse train ICS performance has been characterized at 5- and 15- pulses per train and compared to a single pulse operation under the same operating conditions. Lastly, with the observed near-linear X-ray photon yield gain due to recirculation, as well as noticeably higher operational reliability, the burst-mode ICS offers a great potential for practical scalability towards high duty cycles.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4972344},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 25,
volume = 109,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 22 00:00:00 EST 2016},
month = {Thu Dec 22 00:00:00 EST 2016}
}

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