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Title: sPHENIX Calorimeter Design and Jet Performance

Abstract

The PHENIX collaboration is planning a detector upgrade, sPHENIX, which consists of large acceptance calorimetry and tracking detectors built around the superconducting solenoid recently shipped to Brookhaven from the decommissioned BaBar experiment at SLAC. The sPHENIX calorimeter system includes three radial layers of samplingcalorimeters, a tungsten-scintillating fiber electromagnetic calorimeter, and two longitudinally segmented samplinghadron calorimeters that are made of scintillator tiles and steel plates. Together, they provide hermetic coverage in n < 1 for calorimetry based jet measurements as well as minimal bias jet trigger capability, which coupled with high resolution tracking, enable an extremely rich jet physics program at RHIC.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Nuclear Physics (NP) (SC-26)
OSTI Identifier:
1341657
Report Number(s):
BNL-113381-2016-CP
Journal ID: ISSN 0375-9474
DOE Contract Number:
SC00112704
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 956; Conference: 25th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (QM17); Kobe, Japan; 20160927 through 20161003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; RHIC; heavy ion; calorimeter; jets; Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

Citation Formats

Haggerty J. S. sPHENIX Calorimeter Design and Jet Performance. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2016.02.046.
Haggerty J. S. sPHENIX Calorimeter Design and Jet Performance. United States. doi:10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2016.02.046.
Haggerty J. S. 2016. "sPHENIX Calorimeter Design and Jet Performance". United States. doi:10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2016.02.046.
@article{osti_1341657,
title = {sPHENIX Calorimeter Design and Jet Performance},
author = {Haggerty J. S.},
abstractNote = {The PHENIX collaboration is planning a detector upgrade, sPHENIX, which consists of large acceptance calorimetry and tracking detectors built around the superconducting solenoid recently shipped to Brookhaven from the decommissioned BaBar experiment at SLAC. The sPHENIX calorimeter system includes three radial layers of samplingcalorimeters, a tungsten-scintillating fiber electromagnetic calorimeter, and two longitudinally segmented samplinghadron calorimeters that are made of scintillator tiles and steel plates. Together, they provide hermetic coverage in n < 1 for calorimetry based jet measurements as well as minimal bias jet trigger capability, which coupled with high resolution tracking, enable an extremely rich jet physics program at RHIC.},
doi = {10.1016/j.nuclphysa.2016.02.046},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = 956,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Conference:
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  • The sPHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will perform high precision measurements of jets and heavy flavor observables for a wide selection of nuclear collision systems, elucidating the microscopic nature of strongly interacting matter ranging from nucleons to the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. A prototype of the sPHENIX calorimeter system was tested at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility as experiment T-1044 in the spring of 2016. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMCal) prototype is composed of scintillating fibers embedded in a mixture of tungsten powder and epoxy. The hadronic calorimeter (HCal) prototype is composed of tilted steel plates alternating with plastic scintillator. Results of the test beam reveal the energy resolution for electrons in the EMCal ismore » $$2.8\%\oplus~15.5\%/\sqrt{E}$$ and the energy resolution for hadrons in the combined EMCal plus HCal system is $$13.5\%\oplus 64.9\%/\sqrt{E}$$. These results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed calorimeter system is consistent with \geant simulations and satisfies the sPHENIX specifications.« less
  • The authors describe the design criteria and performance of a CCD based readout system developed for use in the DELPHI experiment at LEP. These circuits are designed for use on the cathode pads of the High Density Projection Chamber (HPC) which will serve as the DELPHI central region electromagnetic calorimeter. Two separate CAMAC versions of this system have been tested on prototype HPC modules exposed to both hadrons and electrons. Stability and performance characteristics of these circuits at CCD input frequencies up to 20 MHz are presented. They also present results on the electron shower energy resolution for the HPCmore » prototypes.« less
  • The D0 detector, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois, USA, is a large hermetic detector designed for the study of proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 2 TeV. The calorimeter is a sampling device that employs uranium absorber and liquid argon as the active material. It has been designed for the high-precision energy measurement of electrons and jets over the full solid angle, and excellent missing transverse energy resolution for enhanced neutrino {open_quotes}detection{close_quotes}. The authors report on some fundamental aspects of the D0 calorimeter`s design and performance (the latter having been measured in both testmore » beams and during recent data taking at the Fermilab collider), and their plan for the upgrade, which has been designed to accomodate the higher luminosities anticipated after completion of the Fermilab Main Injector.« less
  • EG and G Mound Applied Technologies calorimetry personnel have developed a small, thermos-bottle solid-state calorimeter, which is now undergoing performance testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The thermos-bottle solid-state calorimeter is an evaluation prototype for characterizing the heat output of small heat standards and other homogeneous heat sources. The current maximum sample size is 3.5 in. long with a diameter of 0.8 in. The overall size of the thermos bottle and thermoelectric cooling device is 9.25 in. high by 3.75 in. diameter and less than 3 lb. Coupling this unit with compact electronics and a laptop computer makes this calorimetermore » easily hand carried by a single individual. This compactness was achieved by servo controlling the reference temperature below room temperature and replacing the water bath used in conventional calorimeter design with the thermos-bottle insulator. Other design features will also be discussed. The performance of the calorimeter will be presented.« less
  • Here, the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC is planning a major upgrade that involves building an entirely new spectrometer, sPHENIX, that is based around the former BaBar solenoid magnet which will enable a comprehensive study of jets and heavy quarkonia in relativistic heavy ion collisions. It will include two new calorimeter systems, one electromagnetic and one hadronic, that will cover an acceptance of ±1.1 units in pseudorapidity and 2π in azimuth. The hadronic calorimeter will be a steel plate scintillating tile design that is read out with wavelength shifting fibers and silicon photomultipliers. It will be divided into two sections: onemore » (the Inner HCAL) will be situated inside the magnet and the other (the Outer HCAL) will be outside the magnet. The electromagnetic calorimeter will be a SPACAL design consisting of a tungsten powder epoxy matrix absorber with embedded scintillating fibers which are also read out with silicon photomultipliers. The design of sPHENIX and its calorimeter systems has made considerable progress over the past several years and is described in this paper. Prototypes of all three calorimeters were built and tested in the test beam at Fermilab in April of 2016, and the first preliminary results from this test, along with a comparison to Monte Carlo simulations, are also discussed.« less