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Title: Fort Yukon, Alaska DOE Implementation Grant Gwich'in Solar and Energy Efficiency in the Arctic Final Report

Abstract

Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich’in Tribal Government (GZGTG) applied for funding in 2014 under the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Deployment of Clean Energy on Tribal Lands funding opportunity. They were awarded 50% of the project costs for the construction of an 18kW, grid-tied solar PV array on the fort Yukon Tribal Hall, the construction of a 3kW solar PV array on the tribally owned greenhouse, the replacement of inefficient florescent lighting fixtures in the tribal hall to higher efficiency LED lights and the addition of blow in cellulose insulation to the attic of the tribal hall to assist with heat retention. Total DOE Funding for the project was $124,735. Total GZGTG funding for the project was $133,321 for a total project cost of $258,056. The Project was completed with 100% local labor on the tribal hall solar PV installation, the LED lighting retrofit and the insulation on the tribal hall. Based on the results at the tribal hall/office, the tribe also used their own tribal funding to retrofit the lighting in the community hall from florescent to LED lights. The resulting project was completed by the end of Sept 2016 and results have shown a decrease in fuelmore » used at the tribal hall/office of 35% and a decrease in electric costs at the tribal hall of 68%. The total energy costs before the project were approximately $28,000 a year and the energy equivalent of 385 MMBTU/yr. After the project the total energy costs decreased to $11,200/yr. and an energy equivalent of only 242 MMBTU. This represents an overall decrease in energy use of 38%. All in all the tribe and the community regard this project as a huge success!« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government, Fort Yukon, AK (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich'in Tribal Government, Fort Yukon, AK (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office (EE-5W); USDOE The Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (IE)
OSTI Identifier:
1341425
Report Number(s):
DE-EE0006478.000
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006478
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Fort Yukon; Alaska; Arctic; Solar PV; Energy Efficiency

Citation Formats

Cadzow, Janet, and Messier, Dave. Fort Yukon, Alaska DOE Implementation Grant Gwich'in Solar and Energy Efficiency in the Arctic Final Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1341425.
Cadzow, Janet, & Messier, Dave. Fort Yukon, Alaska DOE Implementation Grant Gwich'in Solar and Energy Efficiency in the Arctic Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1341425.
Cadzow, Janet, and Messier, Dave. Mon . "Fort Yukon, Alaska DOE Implementation Grant Gwich'in Solar and Energy Efficiency in the Arctic Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1341425. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1341425.
@article{osti_1341425,
title = {Fort Yukon, Alaska DOE Implementation Grant Gwich'in Solar and Energy Efficiency in the Arctic Final Report},
author = {Cadzow, Janet and Messier, Dave},
abstractNote = {Gwichyaa Zhee Gwich’in Tribal Government (GZGTG) applied for funding in 2014 under the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Deployment of Clean Energy on Tribal Lands funding opportunity. They were awarded 50% of the project costs for the construction of an 18kW, grid-tied solar PV array on the fort Yukon Tribal Hall, the construction of a 3kW solar PV array on the tribally owned greenhouse, the replacement of inefficient florescent lighting fixtures in the tribal hall to higher efficiency LED lights and the addition of blow in cellulose insulation to the attic of the tribal hall to assist with heat retention. Total DOE Funding for the project was $124,735. Total GZGTG funding for the project was $133,321 for a total project cost of $258,056. The Project was completed with 100% local labor on the tribal hall solar PV installation, the LED lighting retrofit and the insulation on the tribal hall. Based on the results at the tribal hall/office, the tribe also used their own tribal funding to retrofit the lighting in the community hall from florescent to LED lights. The resulting project was completed by the end of Sept 2016 and results have shown a decrease in fuel used at the tribal hall/office of 35% and a decrease in electric costs at the tribal hall of 68%. The total energy costs before the project were approximately $28,000 a year and the energy equivalent of 385 MMBTU/yr. After the project the total energy costs decreased to $11,200/yr. and an energy equivalent of only 242 MMBTU. This represents an overall decrease in energy use of 38%. All in all the tribe and the community regard this project as a huge success!},
doi = {10.2172/1341425},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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