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Title: Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1341169
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Nuclear Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 475; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 15:27:07; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3115
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Meric de Bellefon, G., and van Duysen, J. C. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.04.015.
Meric de Bellefon, G., & van Duysen, J. C. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.04.015.
Meric de Bellefon, G., and van Duysen, J. C. 2016. "Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.04.015.
@article{osti_1341169,
title = {Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C},
author = {Meric de Bellefon, G. and van Duysen, J. C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.04.015},
journal = {Journal of Nuclear Materials},
number = C,
volume = 475,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.04.015

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  • The Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for geologic disposal of high level nuclear wastes require multibarriered packages for waste containment that are environmentally stable for the time periods of 300 to 1000 years. In addition to examining the usual corrosion failure modes which must be evaluated in choosing a corrosion resistant material for waste containment (e.g., resistant to pitting, crevice attack, and stress-corrosion cracking), the effects of gamma radiation on the chemical environment surrounding the waste container must also be considered. Austenitic stainless steels have been proposed for use as waste container materials for a potential nuclear waste repository to bemore » located at Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada. This study focuses on the effects of gamma radiation on the corrosion mechanisms of 316L stainless steel in groundwater regional to this site. When gamma irradiation is initiated, corrosion potential shifts in the positive direction are observed for 316L in groundwater regional to the repository site. These potential shifts are associated with the radiation-induced production of hydrogen peroxide. The electrochemical mechanisms involved in the corrosion potential shifts, as well as the subsequent effect on pitting resistance, are considered. 24 refs., 11 figs.« less
  • After reviewing briefly the generally accepted causes of stress corrosion cracking of stainless steels, design of heat exchangers intended for use with chloride containing waters is considered. Conditions causing stress corrosion cracking make tube-side cooling better than shell side, favor designs eliminating stagnation and make mandatory operation resulting in full water boxes. Velocity in excess of 5 fps is recommended. Insulation containing chlorides should be protected from moisture and water temperatures kept as low as possible. Good aeration is necessary and recirculating waters should contain no chromates or other oxidizing compounds. While pH is not critical, this does not meanmore » that pH in concentration cell anolytes is not important. Theoretical considerations involved in the stress corrosion cracking phenomenon are considered. Plastic deformation, which results in the accumulation of stresses at barriers along a slip plane, is viewed as a precedent to cracking. Nickel, among alloy constituents, is seen as beneficial in preventing cracking, and the reasons for this are suggested as an avenue of fruitful investigation. The nature of the corrosion phenomenon, involving such complex factors as films, adsorption effects, and electrical double layers are mentioned as areas where more study would be rewarding. Possibility of thermal or electrochemical concentration of chlorides must be designed out, cleaned out, or kept out of industrial cooling water systems. (auth)« less
  • Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods changes the microstructure (radiation hardening) and microchemistry (radiation-induced segregation) of these steels, and degrades their fracture properties. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is another degradation process that affects LWR internal components exposed to neutron radiation. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs were reviewed to evaluate the effects of key parameters such as material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry onmore » IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of these materials in LWR environments. The significance of microstructural and microchemistry changes in the material on IASCC susceptibility is also discussed. The results are used to determine (a) the threshold fluence for IASCC and (b) the disposition curves for cyclic and IASCC growth rates for irradiated SSs in LWR environments.« less