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Title: Energy-Water Nexus: Balancing the Tradeoffs between Two-Level Decision Makers

Abstract

Energy-water nexus has substantially increased importance in the recent years. Synergistic approaches based on systems-analysis and mathematical models are critical for helping decision makers better understand the interrelationships and tradeoffs between energy and water. In energywater nexus management, various decision makers with different goals and preferences, which are often conflicting, are involved. These decision makers may have different controlling power over the management objectives and the decisions. They make decisions sequentially from the upper level to the lower level, challenging decision making in energy-water nexus. In order to address such planning issues, a bi-level decision model is developed, which improves upon the existing studies by integration of bi-level programming into energy-water nexus management. The developed model represents a methodological contribution to the challenge of sequential decisionmaking in energy-water nexus through provision of an integrated modeling framework/tool. An interactive fuzzy optimization methodology is introduced to seek a satisfactory solution to meet the overall satisfaction of the two-level decision makers. The tradeoffs between the two-level decision makers in energy-water nexus management are effectively addressed and quantified. Application of the proposed model to a synthetic example problem has demonstrated its applicability in practical energy-water nexus management. Optimal solutions for electricity generation, fuel supply,more » water supply including groundwater, surface water and recycled water, capacity expansion of the power plants, and GHG emission control are generated. In conclusion, these analyses are capable of helping decision makers or stakeholders adjust their tolerances to make informed decisions to achieve the overall satisfaction of energy-water nexus management where bi-level sequential decision making process is involved.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computational Earth Science (EES-16), Earth and Environmental Sciences Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1340931
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-23511
Journal ID: ISSN 0306-2619
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Energy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 183; Journal ID: ISSN 0306-2619
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Energy Sciences; Environmental Protection; Mathematics; Energy-water nexus; two-level decision making; tradeoff; GHG emission control

Citation Formats

Zhang, Xiaodong, and Vesselinov, Velimir Valentinov. Energy-Water Nexus: Balancing the Tradeoffs between Two-Level Decision Makers. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.08.156.
Zhang, Xiaodong, & Vesselinov, Velimir Valentinov. Energy-Water Nexus: Balancing the Tradeoffs between Two-Level Decision Makers. United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.08.156.
Zhang, Xiaodong, and Vesselinov, Velimir Valentinov. 2016. "Energy-Water Nexus: Balancing the Tradeoffs between Two-Level Decision Makers". United States. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.08.156. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1340931.
@article{osti_1340931,
title = {Energy-Water Nexus: Balancing the Tradeoffs between Two-Level Decision Makers},
author = {Zhang, Xiaodong and Vesselinov, Velimir Valentinov},
abstractNote = {Energy-water nexus has substantially increased importance in the recent years. Synergistic approaches based on systems-analysis and mathematical models are critical for helping decision makers better understand the interrelationships and tradeoffs between energy and water. In energywater nexus management, various decision makers with different goals and preferences, which are often conflicting, are involved. These decision makers may have different controlling power over the management objectives and the decisions. They make decisions sequentially from the upper level to the lower level, challenging decision making in energy-water nexus. In order to address such planning issues, a bi-level decision model is developed, which improves upon the existing studies by integration of bi-level programming into energy-water nexus management. The developed model represents a methodological contribution to the challenge of sequential decisionmaking in energy-water nexus through provision of an integrated modeling framework/tool. An interactive fuzzy optimization methodology is introduced to seek a satisfactory solution to meet the overall satisfaction of the two-level decision makers. The tradeoffs between the two-level decision makers in energy-water nexus management are effectively addressed and quantified. Application of the proposed model to a synthetic example problem has demonstrated its applicability in practical energy-water nexus management. Optimal solutions for electricity generation, fuel supply, water supply including groundwater, surface water and recycled water, capacity expansion of the power plants, and GHG emission control are generated. In conclusion, these analyses are capable of helping decision makers or stakeholders adjust their tolerances to make informed decisions to achieve the overall satisfaction of energy-water nexus management where bi-level sequential decision making process is involved.},
doi = {10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.08.156},
journal = {Applied Energy},
number = ,
volume = 183,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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