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Title: “Additive Manufacturing: Building the Pathway Towards Process and Material Qualification”

Abstract

The potential benefits of metal additive manufacturing, as compared with more traditional, subtractive-only approaches, has created excitement within design circles seeking to take advantage of the ability to build and repair complex shapes, to integrate or consolidate multiple parts and minimize joining concerns, and to locally tailor material properties to increase functionality. Tempering the excitement of designers, however, has been concerns with the material deposited by the process. It is not enough for a part to ‘look’ right from a geometric perspective. Rather, the metallurgical aspects associated with the material being deposited must ‘look’ and ‘behave’ correctly along with the aforementioned geometric accuracy. Finally, without elucidation of the connections between processing, microstructure, properties, and performance from a materials science perspective, metal additive manufacturing will not realize its potential to change the manufacturing world for property and performance-critical engineering applications.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)
  4. General Electric, Cincinnati, OH (United States)
  5. Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)
  6. General Electric, Niskayuna, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1340926
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-22717
Journal ID: ISSN 1073-5623
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. A, Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 47; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1073-5623
Publisher:
ASM International
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Carpenter, John S., Beese, Allison M., Bourell, David L., Hamilton, Reginald F., Herderick, Edward, Mishra, Rajiv S., and Sears, James. “Additive Manufacturing: Building the Pathway Towards Process and Material Qualification”. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/s11661-016-3577-5.
Carpenter, John S., Beese, Allison M., Bourell, David L., Hamilton, Reginald F., Herderick, Edward, Mishra, Rajiv S., & Sears, James. “Additive Manufacturing: Building the Pathway Towards Process and Material Qualification”. United States. doi:10.1007/s11661-016-3577-5.
Carpenter, John S., Beese, Allison M., Bourell, David L., Hamilton, Reginald F., Herderick, Edward, Mishra, Rajiv S., and Sears, James. 2016. "“Additive Manufacturing: Building the Pathway Towards Process and Material Qualification”". United States. doi:10.1007/s11661-016-3577-5. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1340926.
@article{osti_1340926,
title = {“Additive Manufacturing: Building the Pathway Towards Process and Material Qualification”},
author = {Carpenter, John S. and Beese, Allison M. and Bourell, David L. and Hamilton, Reginald F. and Herderick, Edward and Mishra, Rajiv S. and Sears, James},
abstractNote = {The potential benefits of metal additive manufacturing, as compared with more traditional, subtractive-only approaches, has created excitement within design circles seeking to take advantage of the ability to build and repair complex shapes, to integrate or consolidate multiple parts and minimize joining concerns, and to locally tailor material properties to increase functionality. Tempering the excitement of designers, however, has been concerns with the material deposited by the process. It is not enough for a part to ‘look’ right from a geometric perspective. Rather, the metallurgical aspects associated with the material being deposited must ‘look’ and ‘behave’ correctly along with the aforementioned geometric accuracy. Finally, without elucidation of the connections between processing, microstructure, properties, and performance from a materials science perspective, metal additive manufacturing will not realize its potential to change the manufacturing world for property and performance-critical engineering applications.},
doi = {10.1007/s11661-016-3577-5},
journal = {Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. A, Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science},
number = 8,
volume = 47,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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