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Title: Vitrified hillforts as anthropogenic analogues for nuclear waste glasses - project planning and initiation

Abstract

Nuclear waste must be deposited in such a manner that it does not cause significant impact on the environment or human health. In some cases, the integrity of the repositories will need to sustain for tens to hundreds of thousands of years. In order to ensure such containment, nuclear waste is frequently converted into a very durable glass. It is fundamentally difficult, however, to assure the validity of such containment based on short-term tests alone. To date, some anthropogenic and natural volcanic glasses have been investigated for this purpose. However, glasses produced by ancient cultures for the purpose of joining rocks in stonewalls have not yet been utilized in spite of the fact that they might offer significant insight into the long-term durability of glasses in natural environments. Therefore, a project is being initiated with the scope of obtaining samples and characterizing their environment, as well as to investigate them using a suite of advanced materials characterization techniques. It will be analysed how the hillfort glasses may have been prepared, and to what extent they have altered under in-situ conditions. The ultimate goals are to obtain a better understanding of the alteration behaviour of nuclear waste glasses and its compositionalmore » dependence, and thus to improve and validate models for nuclear waste glass corrosion. The paper deals with project planning and initiation, and also presents some early findings on fusion of amphibolite and on the process for joining the granite stones in the hillfort walls.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1340857
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-118241
Journal ID: ISSN 1743-7601; 49141; EY804910A
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Sustainable Development and Planning, 11(6):897-906; Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Nuclear; waste; long-lived; glass; anthropogenic; analogue; ageing; leaching; hillfort; hill-fort; rampart; amphibolite; Broborg; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Sjoblom, Rolf, Weaver, Jamie L., Peeler, David K., Mccloy, John S., Kruger, Albert A., Ogenhall, E., and Hjarthner-Jolder, E. Vitrified hillforts as anthropogenic analogues for nuclear waste glasses - project planning and initiation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2495/SDP-V11-N6-897-906.
Sjoblom, Rolf, Weaver, Jamie L., Peeler, David K., Mccloy, John S., Kruger, Albert A., Ogenhall, E., & Hjarthner-Jolder, E. Vitrified hillforts as anthropogenic analogues for nuclear waste glasses - project planning and initiation. United States. doi:10.2495/SDP-V11-N6-897-906.
Sjoblom, Rolf, Weaver, Jamie L., Peeler, David K., Mccloy, John S., Kruger, Albert A., Ogenhall, E., and Hjarthner-Jolder, E. Tue . "Vitrified hillforts as anthropogenic analogues for nuclear waste glasses - project planning and initiation". United States. doi:10.2495/SDP-V11-N6-897-906.
@article{osti_1340857,
title = {Vitrified hillforts as anthropogenic analogues for nuclear waste glasses - project planning and initiation},
author = {Sjoblom, Rolf and Weaver, Jamie L. and Peeler, David K. and Mccloy, John S. and Kruger, Albert A. and Ogenhall, E. and Hjarthner-Jolder, E.},
abstractNote = {Nuclear waste must be deposited in such a manner that it does not cause significant impact on the environment or human health. In some cases, the integrity of the repositories will need to sustain for tens to hundreds of thousands of years. In order to ensure such containment, nuclear waste is frequently converted into a very durable glass. It is fundamentally difficult, however, to assure the validity of such containment based on short-term tests alone. To date, some anthropogenic and natural volcanic glasses have been investigated for this purpose. However, glasses produced by ancient cultures for the purpose of joining rocks in stonewalls have not yet been utilized in spite of the fact that they might offer significant insight into the long-term durability of glasses in natural environments. Therefore, a project is being initiated with the scope of obtaining samples and characterizing their environment, as well as to investigate them using a suite of advanced materials characterization techniques. It will be analysed how the hillfort glasses may have been prepared, and to what extent they have altered under in-situ conditions. The ultimate goals are to obtain a better understanding of the alteration behaviour of nuclear waste glasses and its compositional dependence, and thus to improve and validate models for nuclear waste glass corrosion. The paper deals with project planning and initiation, and also presents some early findings on fusion of amphibolite and on the process for joining the granite stones in the hillfort walls.},
doi = {10.2495/SDP-V11-N6-897-906},
journal = {International Journal of Sustainable Development and Planning, 11(6):897-906},
number = 6,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Sep 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}