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Title: Anode-Free Rechargeable Lithium Metal Batteries

Abstract

Anode-free rechargeable lithium (Li) batteries (AFLBs) are phenomenal energy storage systems due to their significantly increased energy density and reduced cost relative to Li-ion batteries, as well as ease of assembly owing to the absence of an active (reactive) anode material. However, significant challenges, including Li dendrite growth and low cycling Coulombic efficiency (CE), have prevented their practical implementation. Here, we report for the first time an anode-free rechargeable lithium battery based on a Cu||LiFePO4 cell structure with an extremely high CE (> 99.8%). This results from the utilization of both an exceptionally stable electrolyte and optimized charge/discharge protocols which minimize the corrosion of the in-situ formed Li metal anode.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [1]
  1. The Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA
  2. Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA
  3. A123 Systems Research and Development, Waltham MA 02451 USA
  4. Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA
  5. Earth and Biological Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA
  6. The Joint Center for Energy Storage Research (JCESR), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Earth and Biological Science Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1340845
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-117788
Journal ID: ISSN 1616-301X; 48776; 48379; KC0208010
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Advanced Functional Materials; Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: 39
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Li battery; anode-free; dendrite; coullombic efficiency; charge rate; discharge rate; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Qian, Jiangfeng, Adams, Brian D., Zheng, Jianming, Xu, Wu, Henderson, Wesley A., Wang, Jun, Bowden, Mark E., Xu, Suochang, Hu, Jianzhi, and Zhang, Ji-Guang. Anode-Free Rechargeable Lithium Metal Batteries. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/adfm.201602353.
Qian, Jiangfeng, Adams, Brian D., Zheng, Jianming, Xu, Wu, Henderson, Wesley A., Wang, Jun, Bowden, Mark E., Xu, Suochang, Hu, Jianzhi, & Zhang, Ji-Guang. Anode-Free Rechargeable Lithium Metal Batteries. United States. doi:10.1002/adfm.201602353.
Qian, Jiangfeng, Adams, Brian D., Zheng, Jianming, Xu, Wu, Henderson, Wesley A., Wang, Jun, Bowden, Mark E., Xu, Suochang, Hu, Jianzhi, and Zhang, Ji-Guang. 2016. "Anode-Free Rechargeable Lithium Metal Batteries". United States. doi:10.1002/adfm.201602353.
@article{osti_1340845,
title = {Anode-Free Rechargeable Lithium Metal Batteries},
author = {Qian, Jiangfeng and Adams, Brian D. and Zheng, Jianming and Xu, Wu and Henderson, Wesley A. and Wang, Jun and Bowden, Mark E. and Xu, Suochang and Hu, Jianzhi and Zhang, Ji-Guang},
abstractNote = {Anode-free rechargeable lithium (Li) batteries (AFLBs) are phenomenal energy storage systems due to their significantly increased energy density and reduced cost relative to Li-ion batteries, as well as ease of assembly owing to the absence of an active (reactive) anode material. However, significant challenges, including Li dendrite growth and low cycling Coulombic efficiency (CE), have prevented their practical implementation. Here, we report for the first time an anode-free rechargeable lithium battery based on a Cu||LiFePO4 cell structure with an extremely high CE (> 99.8%). This results from the utilization of both an exceptionally stable electrolyte and optimized charge/discharge protocols which minimize the corrosion of the in-situ formed Li metal anode.},
doi = {10.1002/adfm.201602353},
journal = {Advanced Functional Materials},
number = 39,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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