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Title: Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals

Abstract

We investigated a novel ionic mixture of an imidazolium-based room temperature IL containing ethylene oxide functionalized phosphite anion and a lithium salt that self-assembles into a smectic-ordered IL crystal. The two key features in this work are the unique origin of the smectic order of the ionic mixtures and the facilitated ion transport behavior in the smectic ordered IL crystal. In fact, the IL crystals are self-assembled through Coulombic interactions between ion species, not through the hydrophilic-phobic interactions between charged ion heads and hydrophobic long alkyl pendants or the steric interaction between mesogenic moieties. Furthermore, the smectic order in the IL crystal ionogel facilitates exceptional and remarkable ionic transport. Large ionic conductivity, viscoelastic robustness, and additional electrochemical stability of the IL crystal ionogels provide promising opportunities for future electrochemical applications.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [3];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [7]
  1. Materials Architecturing Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5 Seongbuk-gu Seoul 136-791 South Korea; School of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Institute of Chemical Process, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro Gwanak-gu Seoul 151-742 South Korea
  2. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA
  3. Department of Chemistry, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro Dongdaemun-gu Seoul 02447 South Korea
  4. Materials Architecturing Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5 Seongbuk-gu Seoul 136-791 South Korea
  5. School of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Institute of Chemical Process, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro Gwanak-gu Seoul 151-742 South Korea
  6. Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802 USA; Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA
  7. Materials Architecturing Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarang-ro 14-gil 5 Seongbuk-gu Seoul 136-791 South Korea; Nanomaterials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro Yuseong-gu Daejeon 305-350 South Korea
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1340816
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-121031
Journal ID: ISSN 0935-9648; 49164; KP1704020
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Advanced Materials; Journal Volume: 28; Journal Issue: 42
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Lee, Jin Hong, Han, Kee Sung, Lee, Je Seung, Lee, Albert S., Park, Seo Kyung, Hong, Sung Yun, Lee, Jong-Chan, Mueller, Karl T., Hong, Soon Man, and Koo, Chong Min. Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/adma.201602702.
Lee, Jin Hong, Han, Kee Sung, Lee, Je Seung, Lee, Albert S., Park, Seo Kyung, Hong, Sung Yun, Lee, Jong-Chan, Mueller, Karl T., Hong, Soon Man, & Koo, Chong Min. Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals. United States. doi:10.1002/adma.201602702.
Lee, Jin Hong, Han, Kee Sung, Lee, Je Seung, Lee, Albert S., Park, Seo Kyung, Hong, Sung Yun, Lee, Jong-Chan, Mueller, Karl T., Hong, Soon Man, and Koo, Chong Min. 2016. "Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals". United States. doi:10.1002/adma.201602702.
@article{osti_1340816,
title = {Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals},
author = {Lee, Jin Hong and Han, Kee Sung and Lee, Je Seung and Lee, Albert S. and Park, Seo Kyung and Hong, Sung Yun and Lee, Jong-Chan and Mueller, Karl T. and Hong, Soon Man and Koo, Chong Min},
abstractNote = {We investigated a novel ionic mixture of an imidazolium-based room temperature IL containing ethylene oxide functionalized phosphite anion and a lithium salt that self-assembles into a smectic-ordered IL crystal. The two key features in this work are the unique origin of the smectic order of the ionic mixtures and the facilitated ion transport behavior in the smectic ordered IL crystal. In fact, the IL crystals are self-assembled through Coulombic interactions between ion species, not through the hydrophilic-phobic interactions between charged ion heads and hydrophobic long alkyl pendants or the steric interaction between mesogenic moieties. Furthermore, the smectic order in the IL crystal ionogel facilitates exceptional and remarkable ionic transport. Large ionic conductivity, viscoelastic robustness, and additional electrochemical stability of the IL crystal ionogels provide promising opportunities for future electrochemical applications.},
doi = {10.1002/adma.201602702},
journal = {Advanced Materials},
number = 42,
volume = 28,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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