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Title: OCEANFILMS-2: Representing coadsorption of saccharides in marine films and potential impacts on modeled marine aerosol chemistry

Abstract

Here we show that the addition of chemical interactions of soluble polysaccharides with a surfactant monolayer improves agreement of modeled sea spray chemistry with observed marine aerosol chemistry. In particular, the fraction of hydroxyl functional groups in modeled sea spray organic matter is increased, improving agreement with FTIR observations of marine aerosol composition. The overall organic fraction of submicron sea spray also increases, allowing organic mass fractions in the range 0.5 – 0.7 for submicron sea spray particles over highly active phytoplankton blooms. We show results from Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) experiments that support the modeling approach, by demonstrating that soluble polysaccharides can strongly adsorb to a lipid monolayer via columbic interactions under appropriate conditions.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4]; ORCiD logo [3];  [2]
  1. Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA
  2. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University, Bozeman Montana USA
  3. Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA
  4. Climate, Ocean, and Sea Ice Modelling Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1340757
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-115449
Journal ID: ISSN 0094-8276; 48281; KP1703020
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geophysical Research Letters; Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 15
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Burrows, Susannah M., Gobrogge, Eric, Fu, Li, Link, Katie, Elliott, Scott M., Wang, Hongfei, and Walker, Rob. OCEANFILMS-2: Representing coadsorption of saccharides in marine films and potential impacts on modeled marine aerosol chemistry. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/2016GL069070.
Burrows, Susannah M., Gobrogge, Eric, Fu, Li, Link, Katie, Elliott, Scott M., Wang, Hongfei, & Walker, Rob. OCEANFILMS-2: Representing coadsorption of saccharides in marine films and potential impacts on modeled marine aerosol chemistry. United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL069070.
Burrows, Susannah M., Gobrogge, Eric, Fu, Li, Link, Katie, Elliott, Scott M., Wang, Hongfei, and Walker, Rob. 2016. "OCEANFILMS-2: Representing coadsorption of saccharides in marine films and potential impacts on modeled marine aerosol chemistry". United States. doi:10.1002/2016GL069070.
@article{osti_1340757,
title = {OCEANFILMS-2: Representing coadsorption of saccharides in marine films and potential impacts on modeled marine aerosol chemistry},
author = {Burrows, Susannah M. and Gobrogge, Eric and Fu, Li and Link, Katie and Elliott, Scott M. and Wang, Hongfei and Walker, Rob},
abstractNote = {Here we show that the addition of chemical interactions of soluble polysaccharides with a surfactant monolayer improves agreement of modeled sea spray chemistry with observed marine aerosol chemistry. In particular, the fraction of hydroxyl functional groups in modeled sea spray organic matter is increased, improving agreement with FTIR observations of marine aerosol composition. The overall organic fraction of submicron sea spray also increases, allowing organic mass fractions in the range 0.5 – 0.7 for submicron sea spray particles over highly active phytoplankton blooms. We show results from Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) experiments that support the modeling approach, by demonstrating that soluble polysaccharides can strongly adsorb to a lipid monolayer via columbic interactions under appropriate conditions.},
doi = {10.1002/2016GL069070},
journal = {Geophysical Research Letters},
number = 15,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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