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Title: A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

Authors:
; ; ; ; ORCiD logo; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1340711
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nature Communications; Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 01, 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Lin, Chuanlong, Smith, Jesse S., Sinogeikin, Stanislav V., Kono, Yoshio, Park, Changyong, Kenney-Benson, Curtis, and Shen, Guoyin. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms14260.
Lin, Chuanlong, Smith, Jesse S., Sinogeikin, Stanislav V., Kono, Yoshio, Park, Changyong, Kenney-Benson, Curtis, & Shen, Guoyin. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms14260.
Lin, Chuanlong, Smith, Jesse S., Sinogeikin, Stanislav V., Kono, Yoshio, Park, Changyong, Kenney-Benson, Curtis, and Shen, Guoyin. Mon . "A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms14260.
@article{osti_1340711,
title = {A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression},
author = {Lin, Chuanlong and Smith, Jesse S. and Sinogeikin, Stanislav V. and Kono, Yoshio and Park, Changyong and Kenney-Benson, Curtis and Shen, Guoyin},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms14260},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = 01, 2017,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid–solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. Themore » decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure–temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Finally, akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought.« less
  • Until now, micrometer-scale or larger crystals of the III-V semiconductors have not been grown at low temperatures for lack of suitable crystallization mechanisms for highly covalent nonmolecular solids. A solution-liquid-solid mechanism for the growth of InP, InAs, and GaAs is described that uses simple, low-temperature ({le}203{degrees}C), solution-phase reactions. The materials are produced as polycrystalline fibers or near-single-crystal whiskers having widths of 10 to 150 nanometers and lengths of up to several micrometers. This mechanism shows that processes analogous to vapor-liquid-solid growth can operate at low temperatures; similar synthesis routes for other covalent solids may be possible. 26 refs., 7 figs.
  • In the ZrO[sub 2]-Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] system, metastable ZrO[sub 2] solid solutions containing up to [approximately]46 mol% Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] crystallize at low temperatures from amorphous materials prepared by the simultaneous hydrolysis of zirconium isopropoxide and yttrium acetylacetonate: t- and c-ZrO[sub 2] phases below and above 8 mol% Y[sub 2]O[sub 3], respectively. The variation of the lattice parameters of both phases is determined as a function of Y[sub 2]O[sub 3] content. The value of the lattice parameter of pure ZrO[sub 2] (tetragonal) is a = 0.5085 nm and c = 0.5170 nm. Powder characterization has been examined using c-ZrO[sub 2]more » solid solution powders prepared in the composition of ZrO[sub 2]/Y[sub 2]O[sub 3][equals]80/20 mol%. Crystallite size, particle size and particle morphology are strongly dependent on heating temperature. Surface areas of powders do not drop below 10 m[sup 2]/g until the heating temperature is above 900 C.« less