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Title: Comparative techno-economic analysis and process design for indirect liquefaction pathways to distillate-range fuels via biomass-derived oxygenated intermediates upgrading

Abstract

This paper presents a comparative techno-economic analysis (TEA) of five conversion pathways from biomass to gasoline-, jet-, and diesel-range hydrocarbons via indirect liquefaction with a specific focus on pathways utilizing oxygenated intermediates. The four emerging pathways of interest are compared with one conventional pathway (Fischer-Tropsch) for the production of the hydrocarbon blendstocks. The processing steps of the four emerging pathways include biomass-to-syngas via indirect gasification, syngas clean-up, conversion of syngas to alcohols/oxygenates followed by conversion of alcohols/oxygenates to hydrocarbon blendstocks via dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation. Conversion of biomass-derived syngas to oxygenated intermediates occurs via three different pathways, producing: (i) mixed alcohols over a MoS 2 catalyst, (ii) mixed oxygenates (a mixture of C 2+ oxygenated compounds, predominantly ethanol, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate) using an Rh-based catalyst, and (iii) ethanol from syngas fermentation. This is followed by the conversion of oxygenates/alcohols to fuel-range olefins in two approaches: (i) mixed alcohols/ethanol to 1-butanol rich mixture via Guerbet reaction, followed by alcohol dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation, and (ii) mixed oxygenates/ethanol to isobutene rich mixture and followed by oligomerization and hydrogenation. The design features a processing capacity of 2000 tonnes/day (2205 short tons) of dry biomass. The minimum fuel selling prices (MFSPs) formore » the four developing pathways range from 3.40 dollars to 5.04 dollars per gasoline-gallon equivalent (GGE), in 2011 US dollars. Sensitivity studies show that MFSPs can be improved with co-product credits and are comparable to the commercial Fischer-Tropsch benchmark ($3.58/GGE). Altogether, this comparative TEA study documents potential economics for the developmental biofuel pathways via mixed oxygenates.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1340652
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1401880
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5100-66921
Journal ID: ISSN 1932-104X
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308; AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-104X
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; biomass; biorefinery; biofuel; indirect liquefaction; oxygenates; process design; techno-economic analysis; sustainability

Citation Formats

Tan, Eric C. D., Snowden-Swan, Lesley J., Talmadge, Michael, Dutta, Abhijit, Jones, Susanne, Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K., Gray, Michel, Dagle, Robert, Padmaperuma, Asanga, Gerber, Mark, Sahir, Asad H., Tao, Ling, and Zhang, Yanan. Comparative techno-economic analysis and process design for indirect liquefaction pathways to distillate-range fuels via biomass-derived oxygenated intermediates upgrading. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/bbb.1710.
Tan, Eric C. D., Snowden-Swan, Lesley J., Talmadge, Michael, Dutta, Abhijit, Jones, Susanne, Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K., Gray, Michel, Dagle, Robert, Padmaperuma, Asanga, Gerber, Mark, Sahir, Asad H., Tao, Ling, & Zhang, Yanan. Comparative techno-economic analysis and process design for indirect liquefaction pathways to distillate-range fuels via biomass-derived oxygenated intermediates upgrading. United States. doi:10.1002/bbb.1710.
Tan, Eric C. D., Snowden-Swan, Lesley J., Talmadge, Michael, Dutta, Abhijit, Jones, Susanne, Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K., Gray, Michel, Dagle, Robert, Padmaperuma, Asanga, Gerber, Mark, Sahir, Asad H., Tao, Ling, and Zhang, Yanan. Tue . "Comparative techno-economic analysis and process design for indirect liquefaction pathways to distillate-range fuels via biomass-derived oxygenated intermediates upgrading". United States. doi:10.1002/bbb.1710. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1340652.
@article{osti_1340652,
title = {Comparative techno-economic analysis and process design for indirect liquefaction pathways to distillate-range fuels via biomass-derived oxygenated intermediates upgrading},
author = {Tan, Eric C. D. and Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. and Talmadge, Michael and Dutta, Abhijit and Jones, Susanne and Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. and Gray, Michel and Dagle, Robert and Padmaperuma, Asanga and Gerber, Mark and Sahir, Asad H. and Tao, Ling and Zhang, Yanan},
abstractNote = {This paper presents a comparative techno-economic analysis (TEA) of five conversion pathways from biomass to gasoline-, jet-, and diesel-range hydrocarbons via indirect liquefaction with a specific focus on pathways utilizing oxygenated intermediates. The four emerging pathways of interest are compared with one conventional pathway (Fischer-Tropsch) for the production of the hydrocarbon blendstocks. The processing steps of the four emerging pathways include biomass-to-syngas via indirect gasification, syngas clean-up, conversion of syngas to alcohols/oxygenates followed by conversion of alcohols/oxygenates to hydrocarbon blendstocks via dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation. Conversion of biomass-derived syngas to oxygenated intermediates occurs via three different pathways, producing: (i) mixed alcohols over a MoS2 catalyst, (ii) mixed oxygenates (a mixture of C2+ oxygenated compounds, predominantly ethanol, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate) using an Rh-based catalyst, and (iii) ethanol from syngas fermentation. This is followed by the conversion of oxygenates/alcohols to fuel-range olefins in two approaches: (i) mixed alcohols/ethanol to 1-butanol rich mixture via Guerbet reaction, followed by alcohol dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation, and (ii) mixed oxygenates/ethanol to isobutene rich mixture and followed by oligomerization and hydrogenation. The design features a processing capacity of 2000 tonnes/day (2205 short tons) of dry biomass. The minimum fuel selling prices (MFSPs) for the four developing pathways range from 3.40 dollars to 5.04 dollars per gasoline-gallon equivalent (GGE), in 2011 US dollars. Sensitivity studies show that MFSPs can be improved with co-product credits and are comparable to the commercial Fischer-Tropsch benchmark ($3.58/GGE). Altogether, this comparative TEA study documents potential economics for the developmental biofuel pathways via mixed oxygenates.},
doi = {10.1002/bbb.1710},
journal = {Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining},
number = 1,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Sep 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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