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Title: Removing Dissolved Silica from Waste Water with Catechol and Active Carbon

Abstract

Fresh water scarcity is going to be a global great challenge in the near future because of the increasing population. Our water resources are limited and, hence, water treatment and recycling methods are the only alternatives for fresh water procurement in the upcoming decades. Water treatment and recycling methods serve to remove harmful or problematic constituents from ground, surface and waste waters prior to its consumption, industrial supply, or other uses. Scale formation in industrial and domestic installations is still an important problem during water treatment. In water treatment, silica scaling is a real and constant concern for plant operations. The focus of this study is on the viability of using a combination of catechol and active carbon to remove dissolved silica from concentrated cooling tower water (CCTW). Various analytical methods, such as ICP-MS and UV-vis, were used to understand the structure-property relationship between the material and the silica removal results. UV-Vis indicates that catechol can react with silica ions and form a silica-catecholate complex. The speciation calculation of catechol and silica shows that catechol and silica bind in the pH range of 8 – 10; there is no evidence of linkage between them in neutral and acidic pHs. Themore » silica removal results indicate that using ~4g/L of catechol and 10g/L active carbon removes up to 50% of the dissolved silica from the CCTW.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nanoscale Sciences Dept.
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Energy Program
  3. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geosciences Dept.
  4. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Physical Chemical and Nano Sciences Center
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1340632
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-0554
650541
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Sasan, Koroush, Brady, Patrick, Krumhansl, James L., and Nenoff, Tina M. Removing Dissolved Silica from Waste Water with Catechol and Active Carbon. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1340632.
Sasan, Koroush, Brady, Patrick, Krumhansl, James L., & Nenoff, Tina M. Removing Dissolved Silica from Waste Water with Catechol and Active Carbon. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1340632
Sasan, Koroush, Brady, Patrick, Krumhansl, James L., and Nenoff, Tina M. 2017. "Removing Dissolved Silica from Waste Water with Catechol and Active Carbon". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1340632. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1340632.
@article{osti_1340632,
title = {Removing Dissolved Silica from Waste Water with Catechol and Active Carbon},
author = {Sasan, Koroush and Brady, Patrick and Krumhansl, James L. and Nenoff, Tina M.},
abstractNote = {Fresh water scarcity is going to be a global great challenge in the near future because of the increasing population. Our water resources are limited and, hence, water treatment and recycling methods are the only alternatives for fresh water procurement in the upcoming decades. Water treatment and recycling methods serve to remove harmful or problematic constituents from ground, surface and waste waters prior to its consumption, industrial supply, or other uses. Scale formation in industrial and domestic installations is still an important problem during water treatment. In water treatment, silica scaling is a real and constant concern for plant operations. The focus of this study is on the viability of using a combination of catechol and active carbon to remove dissolved silica from concentrated cooling tower water (CCTW). Various analytical methods, such as ICP-MS and UV-vis, were used to understand the structure-property relationship between the material and the silica removal results. UV-Vis indicates that catechol can react with silica ions and form a silica-catecholate complex. The speciation calculation of catechol and silica shows that catechol and silica bind in the pH range of 8 – 10; there is no evidence of linkage between them in neutral and acidic pHs. The silica removal results indicate that using ~4g/L of catechol and 10g/L active carbon removes up to 50% of the dissolved silica from the CCTW.},
doi = {10.2172/1340632},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1340632}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {1}
}