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Title: Exploring Electric Polarization Mechanisms in Multiferroic Oxides

Abstract

Multiferroic oxides are a class of systems which exhibit coupling between the electrical polarization and the magnetization. These materials show promise to lead to devices in which ferromagnetic memory can be written with magnetic fields or magnetic bits can be written by an electric field. The work conducted in our research focuses on single phase materials. We studied the detailed coupling of the spin and lattice correlations in these systems. In the first phase of the proposal, we explored the complex spin spiral systems and low temperature behavior of hexagonal layered REMnO 3 (RE= rare earth, Y and Sc) system following the detailed structural changes which occurred on crossing into the magnetic states. The techniques were applied to other layered materials such as superconductors and thermoelectric where the same layered motif exists. The second phase of the proposal focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in the onset high temperature ferroelectricity ion hexagonal REMnO 3 and at low temperature in E-Type magnetic ordered perovskite REMnO 3. We wsynthesized preovskite small A site multiferroics by high pressure and high temperature methods. Detailed measurement of the structural properties and dynamics were conducted over a range of length scales from atomic to mesoscopic scalemore » using, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray diffuse scattering, x-ray and neutron pair distribution analysis and high resolution x-ray diffraction. Changes in vibration modes which occur with the onset of polarization were probed with temperature and pressure dependent infrared absorption spectroscopy. In addition the orthorhombic system (small radius RE ions) which is believed to exhibit electronically driven ferroelectricity and is also not understood was examined. The multiple length scale synchrotron based measurements may assist in developing more detailed models of these materials and possibly lead to device applications. The experimental work was complemented by density functional methods to determine the magnetic ground states and ab initio molecular dynamics methods (AIMD) to determine the high temperature structures. Simulation were carried out on supercomputers at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). An important contribution of this work was the training of graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in materials synthesis, high pressure methods and synchrotron based spectroscopy and x-ray scattering techniques.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Newark, NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Newark, NJ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1340525
Report Number(s):
DEFG02-07ER46402
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-07ER46402
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Tyson, Trevor A. Exploring Electric Polarization Mechanisms in Multiferroic Oxides. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1340525.
Tyson, Trevor A. Exploring Electric Polarization Mechanisms in Multiferroic Oxides. United States. doi:10.2172/1340525.
Tyson, Trevor A. Tue . "Exploring Electric Polarization Mechanisms in Multiferroic Oxides". United States. doi:10.2172/1340525. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1340525.
@article{osti_1340525,
title = {Exploring Electric Polarization Mechanisms in Multiferroic Oxides},
author = {Tyson, Trevor A.},
abstractNote = {Multiferroic oxides are a class of systems which exhibit coupling between the electrical polarization and the magnetization. These materials show promise to lead to devices in which ferromagnetic memory can be written with magnetic fields or magnetic bits can be written by an electric field. The work conducted in our research focuses on single phase materials. We studied the detailed coupling of the spin and lattice correlations in these systems. In the first phase of the proposal, we explored the complex spin spiral systems and low temperature behavior of hexagonal layered REMnO3 (RE= rare earth, Y and Sc) system following the detailed structural changes which occurred on crossing into the magnetic states. The techniques were applied to other layered materials such as superconductors and thermoelectric where the same layered motif exists. The second phase of the proposal focused on understanding the mechanisms involved in the onset high temperature ferroelectricity ion hexagonal REMnO3 and at low temperature in E-Type magnetic ordered perovskite REMnO3. We wsynthesized preovskite small A site multiferroics by high pressure and high temperature methods. Detailed measurement of the structural properties and dynamics were conducted over a range of length scales from atomic to mesoscopic scale using, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray diffuse scattering, x-ray and neutron pair distribution analysis and high resolution x-ray diffraction. Changes in vibration modes which occur with the onset of polarization were probed with temperature and pressure dependent infrared absorption spectroscopy. In addition the orthorhombic system (small radius RE ions) which is believed to exhibit electronically driven ferroelectricity and is also not understood was examined. The multiple length scale synchrotron based measurements may assist in developing more detailed models of these materials and possibly lead to device applications. The experimental work was complemented by density functional methods to determine the magnetic ground states and ab initio molecular dynamics methods (AIMD) to determine the high temperature structures. Simulation were carried out on supercomputers at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). An important contribution of this work was the training of graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in materials synthesis, high pressure methods and synchrotron based spectroscopy and x-ray scattering techniques.},
doi = {10.2172/1340525},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 24 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 24 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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