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Title: Impact of gate geometry on ionic liquid gated ionotronic systems

Abstract

Ionic liquid electrolytes are gaining widespread application as a gate dielectric used to control ion transport in functional materials. This letter systematically examines the important influence that device geometry in standard “side gate” 3-terminal geometries plays in device performance of a well-known oxygen ion conductor. We show that the most influential component of device design is the ratio between the area of the gate electrode and the active channel, while the spacing between these components and their individual shapes has a negligible contribution. Finally, these findings provide much needed guidance in device design intended for ionotronic gating with ionic liquids.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [4];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5]; ORCiD logo [6];  [1];  [2];  [4]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Dept.; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Dept.; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Science
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division
  5. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Dept.
  6. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Chemical Science Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program; National Science Foundation (NSF); Univ. of Tennessee (United States). Joint Directed Research and Development (JDRD) Program; Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1340475
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; SC0002136; 1544686; GBMF4416
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
APL Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 2166-532X
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; electrodes; materials properties; photoresistors; electric measurements; superconductors

Citation Formats

Wong, Anthony T., Noh, Joo Hyon, Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj, Wolf, Ben, Balke, Nina, Herklotz, Andreas, Sharma, Yogesh, Haglund, Amanda V., Dai, Sheng, Mandrus, David, Rack, Philip D., and Ward, Thomas Z. Impact of gate geometry on ionic liquid gated ionotronic systems. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4974485.
Wong, Anthony T., Noh, Joo Hyon, Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj, Wolf, Ben, Balke, Nina, Herklotz, Andreas, Sharma, Yogesh, Haglund, Amanda V., Dai, Sheng, Mandrus, David, Rack, Philip D., & Ward, Thomas Z. Impact of gate geometry on ionic liquid gated ionotronic systems. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4974485.
Wong, Anthony T., Noh, Joo Hyon, Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj, Wolf, Ben, Balke, Nina, Herklotz, Andreas, Sharma, Yogesh, Haglund, Amanda V., Dai, Sheng, Mandrus, David, Rack, Philip D., and Ward, Thomas Z. Mon . "Impact of gate geometry on ionic liquid gated ionotronic systems". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4974485. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1340475.
@article{osti_1340475,
title = {Impact of gate geometry on ionic liquid gated ionotronic systems},
author = {Wong, Anthony T. and Noh, Joo Hyon and Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj and Wolf, Ben and Balke, Nina and Herklotz, Andreas and Sharma, Yogesh and Haglund, Amanda V. and Dai, Sheng and Mandrus, David and Rack, Philip D. and Ward, Thomas Z.},
abstractNote = {Ionic liquid electrolytes are gaining widespread application as a gate dielectric used to control ion transport in functional materials. This letter systematically examines the important influence that device geometry in standard “side gate” 3-terminal geometries plays in device performance of a well-known oxygen ion conductor. We show that the most influential component of device design is the ratio between the area of the gate electrode and the active channel, while the spacing between these components and their individual shapes has a negligible contribution. Finally, these findings provide much needed guidance in device design intended for ionotronic gating with ionic liquids.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4974485},
journal = {APL Materials},
number = 4,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Jan 23 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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