skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Nm-scale spatial resolution x-ray imaging with MLL nanofocusing optics: instrumentational requirements and challenges

Abstract

The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) beamline at NSLS-II has been designed and constructed to enable imaging experiments with unprecedented spatial resolution and detection sensitivity. The HXN X-ray Microscope is a key instrument for the beamline, providing a suite of experimental capabilities which includes scanning fluorescence, diffraction, differential phase contrast and ptychography utilizing Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLL) and zoneplate (ZP) as nanofocusing optics. In this paper, we present technical requirements for the MLL-based scanning microscope, outline the development concept and present first ~15 x 15 nm 2 spatial resolution x-ray fluorescence images.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1340392
Report Number(s):
BNL-112622-2016-JA
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012704; AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Nazaretski, E., Yan, H., Lauer, K., Huang, X., Xu, W., Kalbfleisch, S., Yan, Hui, Li, Li, Bouet, N., Zhou, J., Shu, D., Conley, R., and Chu, Y. S. Nm-scale spatial resolution x-ray imaging with MLL nanofocusing optics: instrumentational requirements and challenges. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1340392.
Nazaretski, E., Yan, H., Lauer, K., Huang, X., Xu, W., Kalbfleisch, S., Yan, Hui, Li, Li, Bouet, N., Zhou, J., Shu, D., Conley, R., & Chu, Y. S. Nm-scale spatial resolution x-ray imaging with MLL nanofocusing optics: instrumentational requirements and challenges. United States. doi:10.2172/1340392.
Nazaretski, E., Yan, H., Lauer, K., Huang, X., Xu, W., Kalbfleisch, S., Yan, Hui, Li, Li, Bouet, N., Zhou, J., Shu, D., Conley, R., and Chu, Y. S. 2016. "Nm-scale spatial resolution x-ray imaging with MLL nanofocusing optics: instrumentational requirements and challenges". United States. doi:10.2172/1340392. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1340392.
@article{osti_1340392,
title = {Nm-scale spatial resolution x-ray imaging with MLL nanofocusing optics: instrumentational requirements and challenges},
author = {Nazaretski, E. and Yan, H. and Lauer, K. and Huang, X. and Xu, W. and Kalbfleisch, S. and Yan, Hui and Li, Li and Bouet, N. and Zhou, J. and Shu, D. and Conley, R. and Chu, Y. S.},
abstractNote = {The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) beamline at NSLS-II has been designed and constructed to enable imaging experiments with unprecedented spatial resolution and detection sensitivity. The HXN X-ray Microscope is a key instrument for the beamline, providing a suite of experimental capabilities which includes scanning fluorescence, diffraction, differential phase contrast and ptychography utilizing Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLL) and zoneplate (ZP) as nanofocusing optics. In this paper, we present technical requirements for the MLL-based scanning microscope, outline the development concept and present first ~15 x 15 nm2 spatial resolution x-ray fluorescence images.},
doi = {10.2172/1340392},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • We have combined, in a single instrument, high spatial resolution optical microscopy with the chemical specificity and conformational selectivity of ion mobility mass spectrometry. We discuss the design and construction of this apparatus as well as our efforts in applying this technique to thin films of molecular semiconductor materials.
  • In recent years, the authors have investigated some of the fundamental theoretical physical limitations imposed on ultrasonic array performance. This has led to the extensive study of energy trapping as one means of enhancing the spatial confinement of element radiation in the array. In this report, they describe a system designed to explore the quality of the images produced by practical trapped energy mode, hybrid trapped energy mode, and other types of arrays. The system implements a 256-channel parallel set of A/D and D/A converters for attachment to an arbitrary array. All 256 channels operate simultaneously at a maximum samplingmore » frequency of 10 MHz. Hence, the total throughput of signal samples reaches 2.5 billion samples per second in a burst mode. The multiple-ported DRAM memory has 1x10/sup 6/ bytes of local high-speed storage. Since all of the input and output signals are in digital form, a wide variety of image-processing techniques can be employed. For example, from a single pulse, it is possible to reconstruct the two-dimensional hologram of the ultrasonic imaging using fast digital hardware. The images can also be prepared by pulse-echo techniques using the same system. Transmission from one portion of the array and monitoring the signal in another portion simultaneously to detect interelement coupling is possible. In this way, all of the key array parameters can be controlled and calibrated. Because of the D/A capability of the system, various signals can be transmitted from each array element, thereby permitting focusing and design of optimum probing signals.« less
  • OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEUTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial 5 to 30 {micro}, are the most promising approach to imaging NIF target plasmas with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. Gel bubble detectors are being tested to record neutron images of ICF implosions in OMEGA experiments. By improving the noise reduction techniques used in analyzing the data taken in June 2000, we have been able to image the neutron emission from 6 {center_dot} 10{sup 13} yield DT target plasmas with amore » target plane spatial resolution of {approx} 140 {micro}. As expected, the spatial resolution was limited by counting statistics as a result of the low neutron detection efficiency of the easy-to-use gel bubble detectors. The results have been submitted for publication and will be the subject of an invited talk at the October 2001 Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society. To improve the counting statistics, data was taken in May 2001 using a stack of four gel detectors and integrated over a series of up to seven high-yield DT shots. Analysis of the 2001 data is still in its early stages. Gel detectors were chosen for these initial tests since the bubbles can be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. They consist of {approx} 5000 drops ({approx} 100 {micro} in diameter) of bubble detector liquid/cm{sup 3} suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector and a light scattering system to record the bubble locations a few microseconds after the neutron exposure when the bubbles are {approx} 10 {micro} in diameter, should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency and a target plane resolution on OMEGA of {approx} 10 to 50 {micro}.« less
  • OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEWTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial resolution of 5 to 30 {micro}, are a promising approach to high-resolution imaging of NIF target plasmas. Gel bubble detectors were used in successful proof-of-principle imaging experiments on OMEGA. Until recently, bubble detectors appeared to be the only approach capable of achieving neutron images of NIF targets with the desired 5 {micro} spatial resolution in the target plane. In 2001, NIF reduced the required standoff distance from the target, so that diagnostic components can now bemore » placed as close as 10 cm to the target plasma. This will allow neutron imaging with higher magnification and may make it possible to obtain 5 {micro}m resolution images on NIF using deuterated scintillators. Having accomplished all that they can hope to on OMEGA using gel detectors, they suggested that the 2002 NLUF shots be used to allow experimental tests of the spatial resolution of the CEA-built deuterated scintillators. The preliminary CEA data from the June 2002 run appears to show the spatial resolution using the deuterated scintillator detector array is improved over that obtained in earlier experiments using the proton-based scintillators. Gel detectors, which consist of {approx} 10 {micro}m diameter drops of bubble detector liquid suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies {approx} 99% of the detector volume, were chosen for the initial tests on OMEGA since they are easy to use. The bubbles could be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. Imaging NIF target plasmas at neutron yields of 10{sup 15} will require a higher detection efficiency detector. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector should result in {approx} 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency which is comparable to that possible using scintillation detectors. A pressure-cycled liquid bubble detector will require a light scattering system to record the bubble locations a few microseconds after the neutron exposure when the bubbles have grown to be {approx} 10 {micro}m in diameter. The next major task planned under this grant will be to perform experimental tests to determine how accurately the spatial distribution of the bubble density can be measured under the conditions expected in NIF. The bubble density will be large enough to produce significant overlap in the two-dimensional images, so that they will need to be able to measure bubbles behind bubbles. One of the goals of these tests is to determine if a simple light transmission approach is feasible. One of the concerns at very high bubble densities is that light scattered out of the path can be rescattered back into the transmitted light path by bubbles in neighboring paths.« less