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Title: Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching

Abstract

Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO 2 and SrTiO 3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (~10 12 inch –2). Here, we systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on–off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  3. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  4. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)
  5. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1340269
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-12857J
Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723; 650070
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; electronic and spintronic devices; electronic properties and materials

Citation Formats

Cho, Seungho, Yun, Chao, Tappertzhofen, Stefan, Kursumovic, Ahmed, Lee, Shinbuhm, Lu, Ping, Jia, Quanxi, Fan, Meng, Jian, Jie, Wang, Haiyan, Hofmann, Stephan, and MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms12373.
Cho, Seungho, Yun, Chao, Tappertzhofen, Stefan, Kursumovic, Ahmed, Lee, Shinbuhm, Lu, Ping, Jia, Quanxi, Fan, Meng, Jian, Jie, Wang, Haiyan, Hofmann, Stephan, & MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L. Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12373.
Cho, Seungho, Yun, Chao, Tappertzhofen, Stefan, Kursumovic, Ahmed, Lee, Shinbuhm, Lu, Ping, Jia, Quanxi, Fan, Meng, Jian, Jie, Wang, Haiyan, Hofmann, Stephan, and MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L. Fri . "Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12373. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1340269.
@article{osti_1340269,
title = {Self-assembled oxide films with tailored nanoscale ionic and electronic channels for controlled resistive switching},
author = {Cho, Seungho and Yun, Chao and Tappertzhofen, Stefan and Kursumovic, Ahmed and Lee, Shinbuhm and Lu, Ping and Jia, Quanxi and Fan, Meng and Jian, Jie and Wang, Haiyan and Hofmann, Stephan and MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.},
abstractNote = {Resistive switches are non-volatile memory cells based on nano-ionic redox processes that offer energy efficient device architectures and open pathways to neuromorphics and cognitive computing. However, channel formation typically requires an irreversible, not well controlled electroforming process, giving difficulty to independently control ionic and electronic properties. The device performance is also limited by the incomplete understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Here, we report a novel memristive model material system based on self-assembled Sm-doped CeO2 and SrTiO3 films that allow the separate tailoring of nanoscale ionic and electronic channels at high density (~1012 inch–2). Here, we systematically show that these devices allow precise engineering of the resistance states, thus enabling large on–off ratios and high reproducibility. The tunable structure presents an ideal platform to explore ionic and electronic mechanisms and we expect a wide potential impact also on other nascent technologies, ranging from ionic gating to micro-solid oxide fuel cells and neuromorphics.},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms12373},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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Cited by: 14works
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