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Title: POROUS IRON OXIDE NANORODS AND THEIR PHOTOTHERMAL APPLICATIONS

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1340195
Report Number(s):
SRNL-L2100-2016-00070
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SPIE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Larsen, G. POROUS IRON OXIDE NANORODS AND THEIR PHOTOTHERMAL APPLICATIONS. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Larsen, G. POROUS IRON OXIDE NANORODS AND THEIR PHOTOTHERMAL APPLICATIONS. United States.
Larsen, G. Fri . "POROUS IRON OXIDE NANORODS AND THEIR PHOTOTHERMAL APPLICATIONS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1340195.
@article{osti_1340195,
title = {POROUS IRON OXIDE NANORODS AND THEIR PHOTOTHERMAL APPLICATIONS},
author = {Larsen, G.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Aug 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Conference:
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