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Title: NUMERICAL MODELS AS ENABLING TOOLS FOR TIDAL-STREAM ENERGY EXTRACTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Abstract

This paper presents a modeling study conducted to evaluate tidal-stream energy extraction and its associated potential environmental impacts using a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, which was coupled with a water-quality model and a tidal-turbine module.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1339905
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-116734
WC0100000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering, June 18-24, 2016, Busan, South Korea, 6:V006T05A006, OMAE2016-54223
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Yang, Zhaoqing, and Wang, Taiping. NUMERICAL MODELS AS ENABLING TOOLS FOR TIDAL-STREAM ENERGY EXTRACTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1115/OMAE2016-54223.
Yang, Zhaoqing, & Wang, Taiping. NUMERICAL MODELS AS ENABLING TOOLS FOR TIDAL-STREAM ENERGY EXTRACTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT. United States. doi:10.1115/OMAE2016-54223.
Yang, Zhaoqing, and Wang, Taiping. 2016. "NUMERICAL MODELS AS ENABLING TOOLS FOR TIDAL-STREAM ENERGY EXTRACTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT". United States. doi:10.1115/OMAE2016-54223.
@article{osti_1339905,
title = {NUMERICAL MODELS AS ENABLING TOOLS FOR TIDAL-STREAM ENERGY EXTRACTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT},
author = {Yang, Zhaoqing and Wang, Taiping},
abstractNote = {This paper presents a modeling study conducted to evaluate tidal-stream energy extraction and its associated potential environmental impacts using a three-dimensional unstructured-grid coastal ocean model, which was coupled with a water-quality model and a tidal-turbine module.},
doi = {10.1115/OMAE2016-54223},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Conference:
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