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Title: Regional Influence of Aerosol Emissions from Wildfires Driven by Combustion Efficiency: Insights from the BBOP Campaign

Abstract

Abstract Wildfires are important contributors to atmospheric aerosols and a large source of emissions that impact regional air quality and global climate. In this study, wildfire emissions in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States were characterized using real-time measurements near their sources using an aircraft, and farther downwind from a fixed ground site located at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (~ 2700 m a.s.l.). The characteristics of aerosol emissions were found to depend strongly on the modified combustion efficiency (MCE), a qualitative index of the combustion processes of a fire. Organic aerosol emissions had negative correlations with MCE, whereas the carbon oxidation state of organic aerosol increased with MCE. The relationships between the aerosol properties and MCE were consistent between fresher emissions (~1 hour old) and emissions sampled after atmospheric transport (6 - 45 hours), suggesting that organic aerosol mass loading and chemical properties were strongly influenced by combustion processes at the source and conserved to a significant extent during regional transport. These results suggest that MCE can be a useful metric for describing aerosol properties of regionally transported wildfire emissions and their impacts on regional air quality and global climate.

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1339820
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-117435
Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X; KP1704010
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: 16
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; biomass burning; aerosol chemistry; BBOA; modified combustion efficiency (MCE); emission factors

Citation Formats

Collier, Sonya, Zhou, Shan, Onasch, Timothy B., Jaffe, Daniel A., Kleinman, Lawrence, Sedlacek, Arthur J., Briggs, Nicole L., Hee, Jonathan, Fortner, Edward, Shilling, John E., Worsnop, Douglas, Yokelson, Robert J., Parworth, Caroline, Ge, Xinlei, Xu, Jianzhong, Butterfield, Zachary, Chand, Duli, Dubey, Manvendra K., Pekour, Mikhail S., Springston, Stephen, and Zhang, Qi. Regional Influence of Aerosol Emissions from Wildfires Driven by Combustion Efficiency: Insights from the BBOP Campaign. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.est.6b01617.
Collier, Sonya, Zhou, Shan, Onasch, Timothy B., Jaffe, Daniel A., Kleinman, Lawrence, Sedlacek, Arthur J., Briggs, Nicole L., Hee, Jonathan, Fortner, Edward, Shilling, John E., Worsnop, Douglas, Yokelson, Robert J., Parworth, Caroline, Ge, Xinlei, Xu, Jianzhong, Butterfield, Zachary, Chand, Duli, Dubey, Manvendra K., Pekour, Mikhail S., Springston, Stephen, & Zhang, Qi. Regional Influence of Aerosol Emissions from Wildfires Driven by Combustion Efficiency: Insights from the BBOP Campaign. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.6b01617.
Collier, Sonya, Zhou, Shan, Onasch, Timothy B., Jaffe, Daniel A., Kleinman, Lawrence, Sedlacek, Arthur J., Briggs, Nicole L., Hee, Jonathan, Fortner, Edward, Shilling, John E., Worsnop, Douglas, Yokelson, Robert J., Parworth, Caroline, Ge, Xinlei, Xu, Jianzhong, Butterfield, Zachary, Chand, Duli, Dubey, Manvendra K., Pekour, Mikhail S., Springston, Stephen, and Zhang, Qi. Tue . "Regional Influence of Aerosol Emissions from Wildfires Driven by Combustion Efficiency: Insights from the BBOP Campaign". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.6b01617.
@article{osti_1339820,
title = {Regional Influence of Aerosol Emissions from Wildfires Driven by Combustion Efficiency: Insights from the BBOP Campaign},
author = {Collier, Sonya and Zhou, Shan and Onasch, Timothy B. and Jaffe, Daniel A. and Kleinman, Lawrence and Sedlacek, Arthur J. and Briggs, Nicole L. and Hee, Jonathan and Fortner, Edward and Shilling, John E. and Worsnop, Douglas and Yokelson, Robert J. and Parworth, Caroline and Ge, Xinlei and Xu, Jianzhong and Butterfield, Zachary and Chand, Duli and Dubey, Manvendra K. and Pekour, Mikhail S. and Springston, Stephen and Zhang, Qi},
abstractNote = {Abstract Wildfires are important contributors to atmospheric aerosols and a large source of emissions that impact regional air quality and global climate. In this study, wildfire emissions in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States were characterized using real-time measurements near their sources using an aircraft, and farther downwind from a fixed ground site located at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (~ 2700 m a.s.l.). The characteristics of aerosol emissions were found to depend strongly on the modified combustion efficiency (MCE), a qualitative index of the combustion processes of a fire. Organic aerosol emissions had negative correlations with MCE, whereas the carbon oxidation state of organic aerosol increased with MCE. The relationships between the aerosol properties and MCE were consistent between fresher emissions (~1 hour old) and emissions sampled after atmospheric transport (6 - 45 hours), suggesting that organic aerosol mass loading and chemical properties were strongly influenced by combustion processes at the source and conserved to a significant extent during regional transport. These results suggest that MCE can be a useful metric for describing aerosol properties of regionally transported wildfire emissions and their impacts on regional air quality and global climate.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.6b01617},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 16,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 16 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Aug 16 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}