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Title: Modeling and Qualification of a Modified Emission Unit for Radioactive Air Emissions Stack Sampling Compliance

Abstract

A planned laboratory space and exhaust system modification to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Material Science and Technology Building indicated a new evaluation of the mixing at the air sampling system location would be required for compliance to ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011. The modified exhaust system would add a third fan thereby increasing the overall exhaust rate out the stack thus voiding the previous mixing study. Prior to modifying the radioactive air emissions exhaust system, a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics computer model was used to evaluate the mixing at the sampling system location. Modeling of the new original three-fan system indicated that not all mixing criteria could be met. A second modeling effort was conducted with the addition of an air blender downstream of the confluence of the three fans which then showed satisfactory mixing results. The final installation included an air blender, and the exhaust system underwent full-scale tests to verify velocity, cyclonic flow, gas, and particulate uniformity. The modeling results and those of the full-scale tests show agreement between each of the evaluated criteria. The use of a computational fluid dynamics code was an effective aid in the design process and allowed the sampling system to remain in its originalmore » location while still meeting the requirements for sampling at a well-mixed location.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1339815
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-116782
Journal ID: ISSN 0017-9078
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Health Physics; Journal Volume: 111; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
atmospheric emissions; air monitoring; environmental monitoring; ANSI; and computational fluid dynamics

Citation Formats

Barnett, J. Matthew, Yu, Xiao-Ying, Recknagle, Kurtis P., and Glissmeyer, John A.. Modeling and Qualification of a Modified Emission Unit for Radioactive Air Emissions Stack Sampling Compliance. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000557.
Barnett, J. Matthew, Yu, Xiao-Ying, Recknagle, Kurtis P., & Glissmeyer, John A.. Modeling and Qualification of a Modified Emission Unit for Radioactive Air Emissions Stack Sampling Compliance. United States. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000557.
Barnett, J. Matthew, Yu, Xiao-Ying, Recknagle, Kurtis P., and Glissmeyer, John A.. 2016. "Modeling and Qualification of a Modified Emission Unit for Radioactive Air Emissions Stack Sampling Compliance". United States. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000557.
@article{osti_1339815,
title = {Modeling and Qualification of a Modified Emission Unit for Radioactive Air Emissions Stack Sampling Compliance},
author = {Barnett, J. Matthew and Yu, Xiao-Ying and Recknagle, Kurtis P. and Glissmeyer, John A.},
abstractNote = {A planned laboratory space and exhaust system modification to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Material Science and Technology Building indicated a new evaluation of the mixing at the air sampling system location would be required for compliance to ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011. The modified exhaust system would add a third fan thereby increasing the overall exhaust rate out the stack thus voiding the previous mixing study. Prior to modifying the radioactive air emissions exhaust system, a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics computer model was used to evaluate the mixing at the sampling system location. Modeling of the new original three-fan system indicated that not all mixing criteria could be met. A second modeling effort was conducted with the addition of an air blender downstream of the confluence of the three fans which then showed satisfactory mixing results. The final installation included an air blender, and the exhaust system underwent full-scale tests to verify velocity, cyclonic flow, gas, and particulate uniformity. The modeling results and those of the full-scale tests show agreement between each of the evaluated criteria. The use of a computational fluid dynamics code was an effective aid in the design process and allowed the sampling system to remain in its original location while still meeting the requirements for sampling at a well-mixed location.},
doi = {10.1097/HP.0000000000000557},
journal = {Health Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 111,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 1
}
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