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Title: Taus and the Trigger for Discovery at ATLAS

Abstract

This five year grant allowed Yale Professor Sarah Demers and her students and postdocs to contribute to the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. We worked on a particular mode of the Higgs Boson decay, contributing to the discovery of this particle as well as measuring the particle's properties. We also performed a "first of its kind" measurement at a hadron collider in the measurement of tau polarization, which increased the sensitivity of ATLAS in a number of exciting ways, both for making measurements of known particles and for hunting for new ones. We also contributed to the tau trigger - the real-time selection that chooses data that includes the signature of the tau lepton. Four PhD students in the Yale Physics Department received their PhDs during the term of this grant, with at least partial support from the grant.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1339650
Report Number(s):
DOE-YALE-06399
SC0006399/E00142; TRN: US1701475
DOE Contract Number:
SC0006399
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; HIGGS BOSONS; TAU PARTICLES; ATLAS DETECTOR; PARTICLE PROPERTIES; PARTICLE DECAY; POLARIZATION; SENSITIVITY; ATLAS; CERN; LHC; taus; Higgs; trigger

Citation Formats

Demers, Sarah. Taus and the Trigger for Discovery at ATLAS. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1339650.
Demers, Sarah. Taus and the Trigger for Discovery at ATLAS. United States. doi:10.2172/1339650.
Demers, Sarah. Thu . "Taus and the Trigger for Discovery at ATLAS". United States. doi:10.2172/1339650. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1339650.
@article{osti_1339650,
title = {Taus and the Trigger for Discovery at ATLAS},
author = {Demers, Sarah},
abstractNote = {This five year grant allowed Yale Professor Sarah Demers and her students and postdocs to contribute to the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. We worked on a particular mode of the Higgs Boson decay, contributing to the discovery of this particle as well as measuring the particle's properties. We also performed a "first of its kind" measurement at a hadron collider in the measurement of tau polarization, which increased the sensitivity of ATLAS in a number of exciting ways, both for making measurements of known particles and for hunting for new ones. We also contributed to the tau trigger - the real-time selection that chooses data that includes the signature of the tau lepton. Four PhD students in the Yale Physics Department received their PhDs during the term of this grant, with at least partial support from the grant.},
doi = {10.2172/1339650},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Jan 19 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The grant "Taus at ATLAS" supported the group of Sarah Demers at Yale University over a period of 8.5 months, bridging the time between her Early Career Award and her inclusion on Yale's grant cycle within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The work supported the functioning of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider and the analysis of ATLAS data. The work included searching for the Higgs Boson in a particular mode of its production (with a W or Z boson) and decay (to a pair of tau leptons.) This was part of a broad program ofmore » characterizing the Higgs boson as we try to understand this recently discovered particle, and whether or not it matches our expectations within the current standard model of particle physics. In addition, group members worked with simulation to understand the physics reach of planned upgrades to the ATLAS experiment. Supported group members include postdoctoral researcher Lotte Thomsen and graduate student Mariel Pettee.« less
  • The sensitivity of the ATLAS detector to the discovery of a heavy charged Higgs boson is presented. Assuming a heavy SUSY spectrum, the most promising channels above the top quark mass are H{sup {+-}} {yields} tb and h{sup {+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}} which provide coverage in the low and high tan {beta} regions up to {approx} 600 GeV. The achievable precisions on the charged Higgs mass and tan {beta} determination are also discussed. The H{sup {+-}} {yields} W{sup {+-}}h{sup 0} channel, though restricted to a small MSSM parameter space, shows a viable signal in NMSSM where the parameter spacemore » is less constrained. The observation of the channel H{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sub L}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} + c.c. may constitute a distinctive evidence for models with singlet neutrinos in large extra dimensions.« less
  • During the past one hundred years three related elementary particles-the electron, the muon, and the tau-were discovered by very different scientific techniques. The author, who received the Wolf Prize and the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the tau, uses this history to discuss certainty and uncertainty in the practice of science. While the emphasis is on the practice of scientific research, the paper also explains for the non-physicist some basic ideas in elementary particle science.
  • This report provides a summary of the Pulser In a Chip 9000-Discretionary LDRD. The program began in January of 1997 and concluded in September of 1997. The over-arching goal of this LDRD is to study whether laser diode triggered photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) can be used to activate electro-optic devices such as Q-switches and Pockels cells and to study possible laser diode/switch integration. The PCSS switches we used were high gain GaAs switches because they can be triggered with small amounts of laser light. The specific goals of the LDRD were to demonstrate: (1) that small laser diode arrays thatmore » are potential candidates for laser-switch integration will indeed trigger the PCSS switch, and (2) that high gain GaAs switches can be used to trigger optical Q-switches in lasers such as the lasers to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and the laser used for direct optical initiation (DOI) of explosives. The technology developed with this LDRD is now the prime candidate for triggering the Q switch in the multiple lasers in the laser trigger system of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and may be utilized in other accelerators. As part of the LDRD we developed a commercial supplier. To study laser/switch integration we tested triggering the high gain GaAs switches with: edge emitting laser diodes, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), and transverse junction stripe (TJS) lasers. The first two types of lasers (edge emitting and VCSELs) did activate the PCSS but are harder to integrate with the PCSS for a compact package. The US lasers, while easier to integrate with the switch, did not trigger the PCSS at the US laser power levels we used. The PCSS was used to activate the Q-switch of the compact laser to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source.« less