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Title: Sorption Modeling and Verification for Off-Gas Treatment

Abstract

This project was successfully executed to provide valuable adsorption data and improve a comprehensive model developed in previous work by the authors. Data obtained were used in an integrated computer program to predict the behavior of adsorption columns. The model is supported by experimental data and has been shown to predict capture of off gas similar to that evolving during the reprocessing of nuclear waste. The computer program structure contains (a) equilibrium models of off-gases with the adsorbate; (b) mass-transfer models to describe off-gas mass transfer to a particle, diffusion through the pores of the particle, and adsorption on the active sites of the particle; and (c) incorporation of these models into fixed bed adsorption modeling, which includes advection through the bed. These models are being connected with the MOOSE (Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment) software developed at the Idaho National Laboratory through DGOSPREY (Discontinuous Galerkin Off-gas SeParation and REcoverY) computer codes developed in this project. Experiments for iodine and water adsorption have been conducted on reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z) for single layered particles. Adsorption apparatuses have been constructed to execute these experiments over a useful range of conditions for temperatures ranging from ambient to 250°C and water dew points rangingmore » from -69 to 19°C. Experimental results were analyzed to determine mass transfer and diffusion of these gases into the particles and to determine which models best describe the single and binary component mass transfer and diffusion processes. The experimental results were also used to demonstrate the capabilities of the comprehensive models developed to predict single-particle adsorption and transients of the adsorption-desorption processes in fixed beds. Models for adsorption and mass transfer have been developed to mathematically describe adsorption kinetics and transport via diffusion and advection processes. These models were built on a numerical framework for solving conservation law problems in one-dimensional geometries such as spheres, cylinders, and lines. Coupled with the framework are specific models for adsorption in commercial adsorbents, such as zeolites and mordenites. Utilizing this modeling approach, the authors were able to accurately describe and predict adsorption kinetic data obtained from experiments at a variety of different temperatures and gas phase concentrations. A demonstration of how these models, and framework, can be used to simulate adsorption in fixed- bed columns is provided. The CO 2 absorption work involved modeling with supportive experimental information. A dynamic model was developed to simulate CO 2 absorption using high alkaline content water solutions. The model is based upon transient mass and energy balances for chemical species commonly present in CO 2 absorption. A computer code was developed to implement CO 2 absorption with a chemical reaction model. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory scale column to determine the model parameters. The influence of geometric parameters and operating variables on CO 2 absorption was studied over a wide range of conditions. Continuing work could employ the model to control column operation and predict the absorption behavior under various input conditions and other prescribed experimental perturbations. The value of the validated models and numerical frameworks developed in this project is that they can be used to predict the sorption behavior of off-gas evolved during the reprocessing of nuclear waste and thus reduce the cost of the experiments. They can also be used to design sorption processes based on concentration limits and flow-rates determined at the plant level.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)
  2. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
  3. Prairie View Texas A&M
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy University Program
OSTI Identifier:
1339639
Report Number(s):
Award# DOE-NFE-14-6423
14-6423
DOE Contract Number:  
NE0008275
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; Sorption Modeling; Off-Gas Treatment

Citation Formats

Tavlarides, Lawrence, Yiacoumi, Sotira, Tsouris, Costas, Gabitto, Jorge, and DePaoli, David. Sorption Modeling and Verification for Off-Gas Treatment. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1339639.
Tavlarides, Lawrence, Yiacoumi, Sotira, Tsouris, Costas, Gabitto, Jorge, & DePaoli, David. Sorption Modeling and Verification for Off-Gas Treatment. United States. doi:10.2172/1339639.
Tavlarides, Lawrence, Yiacoumi, Sotira, Tsouris, Costas, Gabitto, Jorge, and DePaoli, David. Tue . "Sorption Modeling and Verification for Off-Gas Treatment". United States. doi:10.2172/1339639. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1339639.
@article{osti_1339639,
title = {Sorption Modeling and Verification for Off-Gas Treatment},
author = {Tavlarides, Lawrence and Yiacoumi, Sotira and Tsouris, Costas and Gabitto, Jorge and DePaoli, David},
abstractNote = {This project was successfully executed to provide valuable adsorption data and improve a comprehensive model developed in previous work by the authors. Data obtained were used in an integrated computer program to predict the behavior of adsorption columns. The model is supported by experimental data and has been shown to predict capture of off gas similar to that evolving during the reprocessing of nuclear waste. The computer program structure contains (a) equilibrium models of off-gases with the adsorbate; (b) mass-transfer models to describe off-gas mass transfer to a particle, diffusion through the pores of the particle, and adsorption on the active sites of the particle; and (c) incorporation of these models into fixed bed adsorption modeling, which includes advection through the bed. These models are being connected with the MOOSE (Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment) software developed at the Idaho National Laboratory through DGOSPREY (Discontinuous Galerkin Off-gas SeParation and REcoverY) computer codes developed in this project. Experiments for iodine and water adsorption have been conducted on reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z) for single layered particles. Adsorption apparatuses have been constructed to execute these experiments over a useful range of conditions for temperatures ranging from ambient to 250°C and water dew points ranging from -69 to 19°C. Experimental results were analyzed to determine mass transfer and diffusion of these gases into the particles and to determine which models best describe the single and binary component mass transfer and diffusion processes. The experimental results were also used to demonstrate the capabilities of the comprehensive models developed to predict single-particle adsorption and transients of the adsorption-desorption processes in fixed beds. Models for adsorption and mass transfer have been developed to mathematically describe adsorption kinetics and transport via diffusion and advection processes. These models were built on a numerical framework for solving conservation law problems in one-dimensional geometries such as spheres, cylinders, and lines. Coupled with the framework are specific models for adsorption in commercial adsorbents, such as zeolites and mordenites. Utilizing this modeling approach, the authors were able to accurately describe and predict adsorption kinetic data obtained from experiments at a variety of different temperatures and gas phase concentrations. A demonstration of how these models, and framework, can be used to simulate adsorption in fixed- bed columns is provided. The CO2 absorption work involved modeling with supportive experimental information. A dynamic model was developed to simulate CO2 absorption using high alkaline content water solutions. The model is based upon transient mass and energy balances for chemical species commonly present in CO2 absorption. A computer code was developed to implement CO2 absorption with a chemical reaction model. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory scale column to determine the model parameters. The influence of geometric parameters and operating variables on CO2 absorption was studied over a wide range of conditions. Continuing work could employ the model to control column operation and predict the absorption behavior under various input conditions and other prescribed experimental perturbations. The value of the validated models and numerical frameworks developed in this project is that they can be used to predict the sorption behavior of off-gas evolved during the reprocessing of nuclear waste and thus reduce the cost of the experiments. They can also be used to design sorption processes based on concentration limits and flow-rates determined at the plant level.},
doi = {10.2172/1339639},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {12}
}