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Title: History of the Fluids Engineering Division

Abstract

The 90th Anniversary of the Fluids Engineering Division (FED) of ASME will be celebrated on July 10–14, 2016 in Washington, DC. The venue is ASME's Summer Heat Transfer Conference (SHTC), Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting (FEDSM), and International Conference on Nanochannels and Microchannels (ICNMM). The occasion is an opportune time to celebrate and reflect on the origin of FED and its predecessor—the Hydraulic Division (HYD), which existed from 1926–1963. Furthermore, the FED Executive Committee decided that it would be appropriate to publish concurrently a history of the HYD/FED.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Life Fellow ASME, Titusville, NJ (United States)
  2. Georgia Inst. of Technology, South Dennis, MA (United States)
  3. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1339294
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-2118J
Journal ID: ISSN 0098-2202; 619992
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Fluids Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 138; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0098-2202
Publisher:
American Association of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; fluid mechanics; water hammer; Fluids engineering; Fluids; cavitation; machinery; unsteady flow; computational fluid dynamic; hydraulics

Citation Formats

Cooper, Paul, Martin, C. Samuel, and O'Hern, Timothy J.. History of the Fluids Engineering Division. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1115/1.4033976.
Cooper, Paul, Martin, C. Samuel, & O'Hern, Timothy J.. History of the Fluids Engineering Division. United States. doi:10.1115/1.4033976.
Cooper, Paul, Martin, C. Samuel, and O'Hern, Timothy J.. 2016. "History of the Fluids Engineering Division". United States. doi:10.1115/1.4033976. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1339294.
@article{osti_1339294,
title = {History of the Fluids Engineering Division},
author = {Cooper, Paul and Martin, C. Samuel and O'Hern, Timothy J.},
abstractNote = {The 90th Anniversary of the Fluids Engineering Division (FED) of ASME will be celebrated on July 10–14, 2016 in Washington, DC. The venue is ASME's Summer Heat Transfer Conference (SHTC), Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting (FEDSM), and International Conference on Nanochannels and Microchannels (ICNMM). The occasion is an opportune time to celebrate and reflect on the origin of FED and its predecessor—the Hydraulic Division (HYD), which existed from 1926–1963. Furthermore, the FED Executive Committee decided that it would be appropriate to publish concurrently a history of the HYD/FED.},
doi = {10.1115/1.4033976},
journal = {Journal of Fluids Engineering},
number = 10,
volume = 138,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

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