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Title: Short Paper: Frequency Regulation Services from Connected Residential Devices: Preprint

Abstract

In this paper, we demonstrate the potential benefits that residential buildings can provide for frequency regulation services in the electric power grid. In a hardware-in-the- loop (HIL) implementation, simulated homes along with a physical laboratory home are coordinated via a grid aggregator, and it is shown that their aggregate response has the potential to follow the regulation signal on a timescale of seconds. Connected (communication-enabled), devices in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) received demand response (DR) requests from a grid aggregator, and the devices responded accordingly to meet the signal while satisfying user comfort bounds and physical hardware limitations. Future research will address the issues of cybersecurity threats, participation rates, and reducing equipment wear-and-tear while providing grid services.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B)
OSTI Identifier:
1339242
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5D00-66586
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at BuildSys '16: 3rd ACM International Conference on Systems for Energy-Efficient Built Environments, 16-17 November 2016, Palo Alto, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; frequency regulation; demand response; smart appliances; building-to-grid; model predictive control

Citation Formats

Baker, Kyri, Jin, Xin, Vaidhynathan, Deepthi, Jones, Wesley, Christensen, Dane, Sparn, Bethany, Woods, Jason, Sorensen, Harry, and Lunacek, Monte. Short Paper: Frequency Regulation Services from Connected Residential Devices: Preprint. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Baker, Kyri, Jin, Xin, Vaidhynathan, Deepthi, Jones, Wesley, Christensen, Dane, Sparn, Bethany, Woods, Jason, Sorensen, Harry, & Lunacek, Monte. Short Paper: Frequency Regulation Services from Connected Residential Devices: Preprint. United States.
Baker, Kyri, Jin, Xin, Vaidhynathan, Deepthi, Jones, Wesley, Christensen, Dane, Sparn, Bethany, Woods, Jason, Sorensen, Harry, and Lunacek, Monte. Sun . "Short Paper: Frequency Regulation Services from Connected Residential Devices: Preprint". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1339242.
@article{osti_1339242,
title = {Short Paper: Frequency Regulation Services from Connected Residential Devices: Preprint},
author = {Baker, Kyri and Jin, Xin and Vaidhynathan, Deepthi and Jones, Wesley and Christensen, Dane and Sparn, Bethany and Woods, Jason and Sorensen, Harry and Lunacek, Monte},
abstractNote = {In this paper, we demonstrate the potential benefits that residential buildings can provide for frequency regulation services in the electric power grid. In a hardware-in-the- loop (HIL) implementation, simulated homes along with a physical laboratory home are coordinated via a grid aggregator, and it is shown that their aggregate response has the potential to follow the regulation signal on a timescale of seconds. Connected (communication-enabled), devices in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) received demand response (DR) requests from a grid aggregator, and the devices responded accordingly to meet the signal while satisfying user comfort bounds and physical hardware limitations. Future research will address the issues of cybersecurity threats, participation rates, and reducing equipment wear-and-tear while providing grid services.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
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