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Title: High brightness gamma-ray production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility

Abstract

Electron beams with energies of the order of a few 100's of MeV and low transverse emittance, in combination with powerful infrared lasers, allow for the production of high quality gamma rays through Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS). At Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, a 300 MeV beam will be used to generate gamma rays with maximum photon energies of up to ~1.5 MeV and brightness of the order of 10 21 photons/[s-(mm-mrad) 2- 0.1%BW]. Due to the low electron-beam transverse emittance, the relative bandwidth of the scattered radiation is expected to be ≤ 1%. A key challenge toward the production of high radiation dose and brightness is to enhance the energy of the infrared 3 ps laser pulses to the joule level. Finally, in this contribution, we present the plans for the experimental setup, along with comprehensive numerical simulations of the ICS process.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)
  2. Radiabeam Technologies LLC, Santa Monica, CA (United States)
  3. Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
  4. Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1339119
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-16-442-AD-APC
Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X; 1507724
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
AIP Conference Proceedings
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1812; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; Gamma rays; Brightness; Infrared radiation; Integrated circuits; Compton scattering

Citation Formats

Mihalcea, Daniel, Jacobson, B., Murokh, A., Piot, P., and Ruan, J. High brightness gamma-ray production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4975900.
Mihalcea, Daniel, Jacobson, B., Murokh, A., Piot, P., & Ruan, J. High brightness gamma-ray production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4975900.
Mihalcea, Daniel, Jacobson, B., Murokh, A., Piot, P., and Ruan, J. Wed . "High brightness gamma-ray production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4975900. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1339119.
@article{osti_1339119,
title = {High brightness gamma-ray production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility},
author = {Mihalcea, Daniel and Jacobson, B. and Murokh, A. and Piot, P. and Ruan, J.},
abstractNote = {Electron beams with energies of the order of a few 100's of MeV and low transverse emittance, in combination with powerful infrared lasers, allow for the production of high quality gamma rays through Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS). At Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, a 300 MeV beam will be used to generate gamma rays with maximum photon energies of up to ~1.5 MeV and brightness of the order of 1021 photons/[s-(mm-mrad)2- 0.1%BW]. Due to the low electron-beam transverse emittance, the relative bandwidth of the scattered radiation is expected to be ≤ 1%. A key challenge toward the production of high radiation dose and brightness is to enhance the energy of the infrared 3 ps laser pulses to the joule level. Finally, in this contribution, we present the plans for the experimental setup, along with comprehensive numerical simulations of the ICS process.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4975900},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
number = 1,
volume = 1812,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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