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Title: A Data Quality Filter for PMU Measurements: Description, Experience, and Examples

Abstract

Networks of phasor measurement units (PMUs) continue to grow, and along with them, the amount of data available for analysis. With so much data, it is impractical to identify and remove poor quality data manually. The data quality filter described in this paper was developed for use with the Data Integrity and Situation Awareness Tool (DISAT), which analyzes PMU data to identify anomalous system behavior. The filter operates based only on the information included in the data files, without supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data, state estimator values, or system topology information. Measurements are compared to preselected thresholds to determine if they are reliable. Along with the filter's description, examples of data quality issues from application of the filter to nine months of archived PMU data are provided. The paper is intended to aid the reader in recognizing and properly addressing data quality issues in PMU data.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1339038
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-114314
TE1101000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IEEE Power and Energy Society General Meeting (PESGM 2016), July 17-21, 2016, Boston, MA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Phasor Measurement Unit

Citation Formats

Follum, James D., and Amidan, Brett G. A Data Quality Filter for PMU Measurements: Description, Experience, and Examples. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1109/PESGM.2016.7741378.
Follum, James D., & Amidan, Brett G. A Data Quality Filter for PMU Measurements: Description, Experience, and Examples. United States. doi:10.1109/PESGM.2016.7741378.
Follum, James D., and Amidan, Brett G. Sun . "A Data Quality Filter for PMU Measurements: Description, Experience, and Examples". United States. doi:10.1109/PESGM.2016.7741378.
@article{osti_1339038,
title = {A Data Quality Filter for PMU Measurements: Description, Experience, and Examples},
author = {Follum, James D. and Amidan, Brett G.},
abstractNote = {Networks of phasor measurement units (PMUs) continue to grow, and along with them, the amount of data available for analysis. With so much data, it is impractical to identify and remove poor quality data manually. The data quality filter described in this paper was developed for use with the Data Integrity and Situation Awareness Tool (DISAT), which analyzes PMU data to identify anomalous system behavior. The filter operates based only on the information included in the data files, without supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data, state estimator values, or system topology information. Measurements are compared to preselected thresholds to determine if they are reliable. Along with the filter's description, examples of data quality issues from application of the filter to nine months of archived PMU data are provided. The paper is intended to aid the reader in recognizing and properly addressing data quality issues in PMU data.},
doi = {10.1109/PESGM.2016.7741378},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jul 17 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sun Jul 17 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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