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Title: Concentrating Solar Power Gen3 Demonstration Roadmap

Abstract

Today's power-tower concentrating solar power (CSP) technology exists in large part as a result of Department of Energy (DOE) and utility industry funding of demonstration systems in the 1980s and 1990s. Today's most advanced towers are integrated with molten-salt thermal energy storage, delivering thermal energy at 565 degrees C for integration with conventional steam-Rankine cycles. The supercritical carbon dioxide power cycle has been identified as a likely successor to the steam-Rankine power cycle due to its potential for high efficiency when operating at elevated temperatures of 700 degrees C or greater. Over the course of the SunShot Initiative, DOE has supported a number of technology pathways that can operate efficiently at these temperatures and that hold promise to be reliable and cost effective. Three pathways - molten salt, particle, and gaseous - were selected for further investigation based on a two-day workshop held in August of 2016. The information contained in this roadmap identifies research and development challenges and lays out recommended research activities for each of the three pathways. DOE foresees that by successfully addressing the challenges identified in this roadmap, one or more technology pathways will be positioned for demonstration and subsequent commercialization within the next ten years.more » Based on current knowledge of the three power tower technologies, all three have the potential to achieve the SunShot goal of 6 cents/kilowatt-hour. Further development, modeling, and testing are now required to bring one or more of the technologies to a stage where integrated system tests and pilot demonstrations are feasible.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  3. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1338899
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5500-67464
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; concentrating solar power; demonstration roadmap; molten salt receiver; particle receiver; gas-phase receiver; technology gaps

Citation Formats

Mehos, Mark, Turchi, Craig, Vidal, Judith, Wagner, Michael, Ma, Zhiwen, Ho, Clifford, Kolb, William, Andraka, Charles, and Kruizenga, Alan. Concentrating Solar Power Gen3 Demonstration Roadmap. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1338899.
Mehos, Mark, Turchi, Craig, Vidal, Judith, Wagner, Michael, Ma, Zhiwen, Ho, Clifford, Kolb, William, Andraka, Charles, & Kruizenga, Alan. Concentrating Solar Power Gen3 Demonstration Roadmap. United States. doi:10.2172/1338899.
Mehos, Mark, Turchi, Craig, Vidal, Judith, Wagner, Michael, Ma, Zhiwen, Ho, Clifford, Kolb, William, Andraka, Charles, and Kruizenga, Alan. Sun . "Concentrating Solar Power Gen3 Demonstration Roadmap". United States. doi:10.2172/1338899. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338899.
@article{osti_1338899,
title = {Concentrating Solar Power Gen3 Demonstration Roadmap},
author = {Mehos, Mark and Turchi, Craig and Vidal, Judith and Wagner, Michael and Ma, Zhiwen and Ho, Clifford and Kolb, William and Andraka, Charles and Kruizenga, Alan},
abstractNote = {Today's power-tower concentrating solar power (CSP) technology exists in large part as a result of Department of Energy (DOE) and utility industry funding of demonstration systems in the 1980s and 1990s. Today's most advanced towers are integrated with molten-salt thermal energy storage, delivering thermal energy at 565 degrees C for integration with conventional steam-Rankine cycles. The supercritical carbon dioxide power cycle has been identified as a likely successor to the steam-Rankine power cycle due to its potential for high efficiency when operating at elevated temperatures of 700 degrees C or greater. Over the course of the SunShot Initiative, DOE has supported a number of technology pathways that can operate efficiently at these temperatures and that hold promise to be reliable and cost effective. Three pathways - molten salt, particle, and gaseous - were selected for further investigation based on a two-day workshop held in August of 2016. The information contained in this roadmap identifies research and development challenges and lays out recommended research activities for each of the three pathways. DOE foresees that by successfully addressing the challenges identified in this roadmap, one or more technology pathways will be positioned for demonstration and subsequent commercialization within the next ten years. Based on current knowledge of the three power tower technologies, all three have the potential to achieve the SunShot goal of 6 cents/kilowatt-hour. Further development, modeling, and testing are now required to bring one or more of the technologies to a stage where integrated system tests and pilot demonstrations are feasible.},
doi = {10.2172/1338899},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {1}
}

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