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Title: PORE SATURATION MODEL FOR CAPILLARY IMBIBITION AND DRAINAGE PRESSURES

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1338811
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2016-00270
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2016 AIChE Annual Meeting
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Laurinat, J. PORE SATURATION MODEL FOR CAPILLARY IMBIBITION AND DRAINAGE PRESSURES. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Laurinat, J. PORE SATURATION MODEL FOR CAPILLARY IMBIBITION AND DRAINAGE PRESSURES. United States.
Laurinat, J. 2016. "PORE SATURATION MODEL FOR CAPILLARY IMBIBITION AND DRAINAGE PRESSURES". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338811.
@article{osti_1338811,
title = {PORE SATURATION MODEL FOR CAPILLARY IMBIBITION AND DRAINAGE PRESSURES},
author = {Laurinat, J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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  • A pore saturation model expresses the capillary pressure as a function of a characteristic pore pressure and the wetting phase saturation. Singularity analyses of the total energies of the wetting and nonwetting phases give the residual saturations for the two phases. The total energy consists of a potential term and a work term associated with the effective pressure gradient for each phase. The derived residual wetting saturation is 0.236, and the derived residual nonwetting saturation is 0.884. The model includes separate pressures for imbibition and drainage to account for capillary hysteresis. In the model, the pressure gradient for the wettingmore » phase defines the imbibition pressure, and the nonwetting phase pressure gradient defines the drainage pressure. At the residual nonwetting saturation, the two pressures differ by the characteristic pore pressure. The two pressures coincide at a critical minimum saturation of 0.301. The model also includes an entry head to account for the minimum force required for drainage to begin. The model utilizes a single fitting parameter, a characteristic pore pressure, which can be related to a characteristic pore diameter.« less
  • A pore saturation model expresses the capillary pressure as a function of a characteristic pore pressure and the wetting phase saturation. Singularity analyses of the total energies of the wetting and nonwetting phases give the residual saturations for the two phases. The total energy consists of a potential term and a work term associated with the effective pressure gradient for each phase. The derived residual wetting saturation is 0.236, and the derived residual nonwetting saturation is 0.884. The model includes separate pressures for imbibition and drainage to account for capillary hysteresis. In the model, the pressure gradient for the wettingmore » phase defines the imbibition pressure, and the nonwetting phase pressure gradient defines the drainage pressure. At the residual nonwetting saturation, the two pressures differ by the characteristic pore pressure. The two pressures coincide at a critical minimum saturation of 0.301. The model also includes an entry head to account for the minimum force required for drainage to begin. The model uses a single fitting parameter, a characteristic pore pressure, which can be related to a characteristic pore diameter.« less
  • Dewatering of fine coal by continuous filtration involves filter cake formation and removal of surface moisture by drawing air through the capillaries of the cake. In order to gain a better understanding of the complex transport phenomena that occur in the filter cake, analysis of the effect of three-dimensional pore geometry on the effective transport properties of the filter cake is necessary. This paper provides information on the techniques and methodology necessary to provide a detailed three-dimensional analysis of a completely interconnected porous system. In addition, a conceptual capillary network model based on a 3-D interconnected porous system is proposed.
  • Relative permeabilities are widely used by the petroleum industry in reservoir simulations of recovery strategies. In recent years, pore level modeling has been used to determine relative permeabilities at zero capillary number for a variety of more and more realistic model porous media. Unfortunately, these studies cannot address the issue of the observed capillary number dependence of the relative permeabilities. Several years ago, we presented a method for determining the relative permeabilities from pore-level modeling at general capillary number. We have used this method to determine the relative permeabilities at several capillary numbers and stable viscosity ratios. In addition, wemore » have determined these relative permeabilities using one of the standard dynamic methods for determining relative permeabilities from core flood experiments. Our results from the two methods are compared with each other and with experimental results.« less
  • A critical component of all multiphase flow codes is how relationships among relative permeabilities, fluid saturations, and capillary pressures (i.e., k-S-P relations) are described. Models that are able to mimic fundamental fluid-flow processes to predict k S-P relations are preferable than extrapolating measured data points to estimate k-S-P relations because they may have greater utility and may be more consistent. Furthermore, different saturation-path histories may be simulated with a computer code than those measured in the k-S-P experiments. Because the geometry of the pore spaces in natural porous media is very complex and will likely never be precisely known tomore » predict k-S-P behavior from fundamental relationships, k-S-P models are largely empirical. In this paper, an empirical model based on theoretical considerations is developed to predict hysteretic k-S-P relations in porous media in which the smaller pores are water-wet and the larger pores are oil-wet, i.e., mixed-w et. At high oil-water capillary pressures, the water saturation is modeled to approach the residual water saturation. At low oil-water capillary pressures (i.e., negative), the oil saturation is modeled to approach the residual oil saturation. Relative permeabilities are predicted using parameters that describe main-drainage S-P relations and accounting for the distribution of water and oil in the pore spaces of mixed-wet porous media. The proposed algebraic expressions are easy to implement in multiphase flow codes and can be used to predict k-S-P relations for any saturation-path history. In addition, the model is relatively easy to calibrate to porous media.« less